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Determinants of aggregate length of hospital stay in the last year of life in Switzerland

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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19 Mendeley
Title
Determinants of aggregate length of hospital stay in the last year of life in Switzerland
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1725-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Damian Hedinger, Julia Braun, Vladimir Kaplan, Matthias Bopp

Abstract

In contrast to individual preferences, most people in developed countries die in health care institutions, with a considerable impact on health care resource use and costs. However, evidence about determinants of aggregate length of hospital stay in the last year preceding death is scant. Nationwide individual patient data from Swiss hospital discharge statistics were linked with census and mortality records from the Swiss National Cohort. We explored determinants of aggregate length of hospital stay in the last year of life in N = 35,598 inpatients ≥65 years who deceased in 2007 or 2008. The average aggregate length of hospital stay in the last year of life was substantially longer in the German speaking region compared to the French (IRR 1.36 [95 % CI 1.32-1.40]) and Italian (IRR 1.22 [95 % CI 1.16-1.29]) speaking region of the country. Increasing age, female sex, multimorbidity, being divorced, foreign nationality, and high educational level prolonged, whereas home ownership shortened the aggregate length of hospital stay. Individuals with complementary private health insurance plans had longer stays than those with compulsory health insurance plans (IRR 1.04 [95 % CI 1.01-1.07]). The aggregate length of hospital stay during the last year of life was substantially determined by regional and socio-demographic characteristics, and only partially explained by differential health conditions. Therefore, more detailed studies need to evaluate, whether these differences are based on patients' health care needs and preferences, or whether they are supply-driven.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 5%
Unknown 18 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 42%
Student > Master 3 16%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Librarian 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 32%
Social Sciences 5 26%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 11%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 August 2017.
All research outputs
#3,226,452
of 11,586,569 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#1,540
of 3,727 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,331
of 257,891 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#91
of 205 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,586,569 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,727 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,891 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 205 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.