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Clinically suspected T4 colorectal cancer may be resected using a laparoscopic approach

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, September 2016
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Title
Clinically suspected T4 colorectal cancer may be resected using a laparoscopic approach
Published in
BMC Cancer, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12885-016-2753-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jong Seob Park, Jung Wook Huh, Yoon Ah Park, Yong Beom Cho, Seong Hyeon Yun, Hee Cheol Kim, Woo Yong Lee, Ho-Kyung Chun

Abstract

The role of laparoscopic resection in patients with clinically suspicious T4 colorectal cancer remains controversial. The aim of this study was to compare the long-term and oncologic outcomes of laparoscopic resection and the open approach in clinical T4 colorectal cancer. Two hundred ninety-three consecutive patients undergoing curative surgery for colorectal cancer suspected to be T4 by computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging were reviewed. Despite clinical suspicion of T4 disease in all cases, concordance with pathologic determination of T4 was only 37.9 %. Of the 71 patients in the laparoscopic group, four (5.6 %) were converted to the open technique. Patients in the laparoscopic group had significantly lower estimated blood loss (p < 0.001), fewer days to first flatus (p = 0.001), shorter length of hospital stay (p < 0.001), and fewer adverse events (14.1 % versus 31.5 %, p = 0.004). After a median follow-up of 36 months, 5-year disease-free survival was not significantly different between the two groups (81.8 % in laparoscopic versus 73.9 % in open surgery, p = 0.433). The clinical factors that predicted T4 staging on pathologic examination were found to be male sex (p = 0.038), preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen status (p = 0.021), clinical N status (p = 0.046), and clinical cancer perforation (p = 0.004). Laparoscopic colorectal resection for T4 colorectal cancer has perioperative and long-term oncologic outcomes similar to those of the open approach when performed by an experienced surgeon.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 2 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 22%
Researcher 2 22%
Student > Master 1 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 11%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 56%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 11%
Unknown 2 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 September 2016.
All research outputs
#7,203,183
of 8,331,095 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#2,808
of 3,500 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#210,873
of 252,316 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#136
of 195 outputs
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