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Comparison of patient perceptions of Telehealth-supported and specialist nursing interventions for early stage COPD: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, August 2016
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Title
Comparison of patient perceptions of Telehealth-supported and specialist nursing interventions for early stage COPD: a qualitative study
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1623-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Deborah A. Fitzsimmons, Jill Thompson, Claire L. Bentley, Gail A. Mountain

Abstract

The increasing prevalence and associated cost of treating Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is unsustainable, and focus is needed on self-management and prevention of hospital admissions. Telehealth monitoring of patients' vital signs allows clinicians to prioritise their workload and enables patients to take more responsibility for their health. This paper reports the results of a qualitative study embedded within a feasibility and pilot Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) of Telehealth-supported care within a community-based COPD supported-discharge service. The aim of the study was to qualitatively explore the experiences of patients with COPD who had received either a Telehealth-supported or a specialist nursing intervention following their discharge from hospital after an admission for a COPD exacerbation. Patients were invited to either participate in semi-structured interviews or to complete a semi-structured self-administered questionnaire on completion of the intervention. Nine patients were interviewed (67 % female) and seventeen patients completed the questionnaires. In addition, three clinicians responsible for the delivery of both interventions were interviewed to obtain their perspectives on the new services. Seven underlying themes emerged from the patient interviews and were further explored in the questionnaires: (1) patient demographics; (2) information received by the participants; (3) installation of the Telehealth technology; (4) Telehealth service functionality; (5) visits; (6) service withdrawal; and (7) service perceptions. Recipients of both services reported feelings of safety derived from the delivery of an integrated, community-based service. Although recipients of the Telehealth service received 50 % fewer home visits from the clinicians than recipients of a more traditional community-based nursing intervention, the patients were enthusiastic about the service, with some describing it as the best service they had ever received. This suggests that a Telehealth intervention is an acceptable alternative to a more traditional home nursing visit model for monitoring community-based patients with COPD following their discharge from hospital. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN68856013.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 95 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 21%
Unspecified 12 13%
Student > Bachelor 11 11%
Researcher 7 7%
Other 24 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 18%
Unspecified 16 17%
Social Sciences 9 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 6 6%
Other 22 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 November 2017.
All research outputs
#9,679,246
of 12,104,225 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#3,278
of 3,936 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,896
of 261,276 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#177
of 208 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,104,225 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,936 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 208 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.