↓ Skip to main content

Adult reversal of cognitive phenotypes in neurodevelopmental disorders

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, June 2009
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
65 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Adult reversal of cognitive phenotypes in neurodevelopmental disorders
Published in
Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, June 2009
DOI 10.1007/s11689-009-9018-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alcino J. Silva, Dan Ehninger

Abstract

Recent findings in mice suggest that it is possible to reverse certain neurodevelopmental disorders in adults. Changes in development, previously thought to be irreparable in adults, were believed to underlie the neurological and psychiatric phenotypes of a range of common mental health problems with a clear developmental component. As a consequence, most researchers have focused their efforts on understanding the molecular and cellular processes that alter development with the hope that early intervention could prevent the emergent pathology. Unexpectedly, several different animal model studies published recently, including animal models of autism, suggest that it may be possible to reverse neurodevelopmental disorders in adults: Addressing the underlying molecular and cellular deficits in adults could in several cases dramatically improve the neurocognitive phenotypes in these animal models. The findings reviewed here provide hope to millions of individuals afflicted with a wide range of neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism, since they suggest that it may be possible to treat or even cure them in adults.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 5%
Netherlands 2 3%
Poland 1 2%
Italy 1 2%
Portugal 1 2%
Unknown 57 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 20%
Professor 7 11%
Student > Master 5 8%
Other 5 8%
Other 15 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 45%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 17%
Neuroscience 8 12%
Unspecified 6 9%
Psychology 4 6%
Other 7 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 February 2013.
All research outputs
#7,555,150
of 12,528,744 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
#189
of 267 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,256
of 250,502 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
#15
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,528,744 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 267 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 250,502 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.