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Antimicrobial susceptibility testing in predicting the presence of carbapenemase genes in Enterobacteriaceae in South Africa

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

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3 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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41 Mendeley
Title
Antimicrobial susceptibility testing in predicting the presence of carbapenemase genes in Enterobacteriaceae in South Africa
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1858-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ashika Singh-Moodley, Olga Perovic

Abstract

Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) is a concern in South Africa and worldwide. It is therefore important that these organisms be accurately identified for infection prevention control purposes. In this study 1193 suspected CREs from 46 laboratories from seven provinces in South Africa were assessed to confirm the prevalence of carbapenemase genes from our referral diagnostic isolates for the period 2012 to 2015. We compared the antimicrobial susceptibility testing method used in the reference laboratory to the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) which is used as the gold standard. Organism identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed using automated systems and DNA was extracted using a crude boiling method. The presence of carbapenemase-producing genes (bla NDM, bla KPC, bla OXA-48&variants, bla GES, bla IMP and bla VIM) was screened for using a multiplex real-time PCR. Sixty-eight percent (n = 812) of the isolates harboured a carbapenemase-producing gene; the three most common genes included: bla NDM, bla OXA-48&variants and bla VIM. Majority of the carbapenemase producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) isolates were Klebsiella species (71 %). The Microscan® Walkaway system used for the screening of carbapenemase production was 98 % sensitive with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoint of less than 0.5 as susceptible for ertapenem and a low specificity (13 %). From this study we can conclude that carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae is increasing in South Africa and the use of phenotypic methods for detection of CPEs showed good sensitivity but lacked specificity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 20%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Postgraduate 5 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 6 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 11 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 8 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2017.
All research outputs
#6,731,266
of 11,379,716 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,123
of 4,230 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#130,812
of 259,669 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#92
of 198 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,379,716 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,230 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,669 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 198 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.