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Recommendations from primary care providers for integrating mental health in a primary care system in rural Nepal

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
45 Mendeley
Title
Recommendations from primary care providers for integrating mental health in a primary care system in rural Nepal
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1768-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bibhav Acharya, Jasmine Tenpa, Poshan Thapa, Bikash Gauchan, David Citrin, Maria Ekstrand

Abstract

Globally, access to mental healthcare is often lacking in rural, low-resource settings. Mental healthcare services integration in primary care settings is a key intervention to address this gap. A common strategy includes embedding mental healthcare workers on-site, and receiving consultation from an off-site psychiatrist. Primary care provider perspectives are important for successful program implementation. We conducted three focus groups with all 24 primary care providers at a district-level hospital in rural Nepal. We asked participants about their concerns and recommendations for an integrated mental healthcare delivery program. They were also asked about current practices in seeking referral for patients with mental illness. We collected data using structured notes and analyzed the data by template coding to develop themes around concerns and recommendations for an integrated program. Participants noted that the current referral system included sending patients to the nearest psychiatrist who is 14 h away. Participants did not think this was effective, and stated that integrating mental health into the existing primary care setting would be ideal. Their major concerns about a proposed program included workplace hierarchies between mental healthcare workers and other clinicians, impact of staff turnover on patients, reliability of an off-site consultant psychiatrist, and ability of on-site primary care providers to screen patients and follow recommendations from an off-site psychiatrist. Their suggestions included training a few existing primary care providers as dedicated mental healthcare workers, recruiting both senior and junior mental healthcare workers to ensure retention, recruiting academic psychiatrists for reliability, and training all primary care providers to appropriately screen for mental illness and follow recommendations from the psychiatrist. Primary care providers in rural Nepal reported the failure of the current system of referral, which includes sending patients to a distant city. They welcomed integrating mental healthcare into the primary care system, and reported several concerns and recommendations to increase the likelihood of successful implementation of such a program.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 9 20%
Researcher 7 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 16%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Other 13 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 24%
Unspecified 10 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 7%
Psychology 3 7%
Other 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2017.
All research outputs
#1,729,901
of 11,097,556 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#763
of 3,565 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,885
of 257,136 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#32
of 158 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,097,556 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,565 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,136 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 158 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.