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Use of structured musculoskeletal examination routines in undergraduate medical education and postgraduate clinical practice – a UK survey

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, October 2016
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1 tweeter
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Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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14 Mendeley
Title
Use of structured musculoskeletal examination routines in undergraduate medical education and postgraduate clinical practice – a UK survey
Published in
BMC Medical Education, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12909-016-0799-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kenneth F Baker, Sharmila Jandial, Ben Thompson, David Walker, Ken Taylor, Helen E Foster

Abstract

Structured examination routines have been developed as educational resources for musculoskeletal clinical skills teaching, including Gait-Arms-Legs-Spine (GALS), Regional Examination of the Musculoskeletal System (REMS) and paediatric GALS (pGALS). In this study, we aimed to assess the awareness and use of these examination routines in undergraduate medical teaching in UK medical schools and UK postgraduate clinical practice. Electronic questionnaires were distributed to adult and paediatric musculoskeletal teaching leads at UK medical schools and current UK doctors in training. Responses were received from 67 tutors representing teaching at 22/33 [67 %] of all UK medical schools, and 70 trainee doctors across a range of postgraduate training specialities. There was widespread adoption, at responding medical schools, of the adult examination routines within musculoskeletal teaching (GALS: 14/16 [88 %]; REMS: 12/16 [75 %]) and assessment (GALS: 13/16 [81 %]; REMS: 12/16 [75 %]). More trainees were aware of GALS (64/70 [91 %]) than REMS (14/67 [21 %]). Of the 39 trainees who used GALS in their clinical practice, 35/39 [90 %] reported that it had improved their confidence in musculoskeletal examination. Of the 17/22 responding medical schools that included paediatric musculoskeletal examination within their curricula, 15/17 [88 %] used the pGALS approach and this was included within student assessment at 4 medical schools. We demonstrate the widespread adoption of these examination routines in undergraduate education and significant uptake in postgraduate clinical practice. Further study is required to understand their impact upon clinical performance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 7%
Unknown 13 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 36%
Student > Master 2 14%
Student > Postgraduate 2 14%
Student > Bachelor 1 7%
Lecturer 1 7%
Other 3 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 43%
Unspecified 5 36%
Psychology 1 7%
Social Sciences 1 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 7%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 November 2016.
All research outputs
#6,271,902
of 8,642,080 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#1,010
of 1,317 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#142,125
of 219,273 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#30
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,642,080 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,317 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 219,273 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.