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Processing of meats and cardiovascular risk: time to focus on preservatives

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, May 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
46 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
39 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
104 Mendeley
Title
Processing of meats and cardiovascular risk: time to focus on preservatives
Published in
BMC Medicine, May 2013
DOI 10.1186/1741-7015-11-136
Pubmed ID
Authors

Renata Micha, Georgios Michas, Martin Lajous, Dariush Mozaffarian

Abstract

Dietary guidelines emphasize selecting lean (low-fat) meats to reduce saturated fat and cholesterol, but growing evidence suggests that health effects may relate to other ingredients, such as sodium, heme iron, or L-carnitine. Understanding how meats influence health, and on which nutrients this relationship depends, is essential to advise consumer choices, set guidelines, and inform food reformulations. A recent study published in BMC Medicine involving 448,568 participants in 10 European countries, provides important evidence in this regard. After multivariate adjustment, intake of unprocessed red meat was not significantly associated with total or cause-specific mortality; conversely, intake of processed meat was associated with a 30% higher rate of cardiovascular disease (CVD) (per 50 g/day, relative risk 1.30, 95% confidence interval 1.17 to 1.45) and also higher cancer mortality. These findings are consistent with our previous meta-analysis, based on smaller studies, showing strong associations of processed meats, but not unprocessed meats, with CVD. Preservatives are the notable difference; the calculated blood-pressure effects of sodium differences (around 400% higher in processed meats) explain most of the observed higher risk. Although unprocessed red meats seem to be relatively neutral for CVD, healthier choices are available, including fish, nuts, legumes, fruits, and vegetables. Public-health guidance should prioritize avoidance of processed meats, including the low-fat deli meats currently marketed as healthy choices, and the food industry should substantially reduce sodium and other preservatives in processed meats.See related research article here http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/63.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 46 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 99 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 27 26%
Student > Master 25 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 13%
Researcher 9 9%
Other 8 8%
Other 22 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 37 36%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 16%
Unspecified 5 5%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Other 22 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 78. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 January 2019.
All research outputs
#206,276
of 13,237,907 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#187
of 2,111 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,259
of 150,811 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,237,907 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,111 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 34.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 150,811 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them