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Gut microbiota disturbance during helminth infection: can it affect cognition and behaviour of children?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
87 Mendeley
Title
Gut microbiota disturbance during helminth infection: can it affect cognition and behaviour of children?
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-2146-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vanina Guernier, Bradley Brennan, Laith Yakob, Gabriel Milinovich, Archie C. A. Clements, Ricardo J. Soares Magalhaes

Abstract

Bidirectional signalling between the brain and the gastrointestinal tract is regulated at neural, hormonal, and immunological levels. Recent studies have shown that helminth infections can alter the normal gut microbiota. Studies have also shown that the gut microbiota is instrumental in the normal development, maturation and function of the brain. The pathophysiological pathways by which helminth infections contribute to altered cognitive function remain poorly understood. We put forward the hypothesis that gastrointestinal infections with parasitic worms, such as helminths, induce an imbalance of the gut-brain axis, which, in turn, can detrimentally manifest in brain development. Factors supporting this hypothesis are: 1) research focusing on intelligence and school performance in school-aged children has shown helminth infections to be associated with cognitive impairment, 2) disturbances in gut microbiota have been shown to be associated with important cognitive developmental effects, and 3) helminth infections have been shown to alter the gut microbiota structure. Evidence on the complex interactions between extrinsic (parasite) and intrinsic (host-derived) factors has been synthesised and discussed. While evidence in favour of the helminth-gut microbiota-central nervous system hypothesis is circumstantial, it would be unwise to rule it out as a possible mechanism by which gastrointestinal helminth infections induce childhood cognitive morbidity. Further empirical studies are necessary to test an indirect effect of helminth infections on the modulation of mood and behaviour through its effects on the gut microbiota.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 86 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 22%
Researcher 16 18%
Student > Bachelor 15 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 15%
Unspecified 9 10%
Other 15 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 18%
Unspecified 11 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 9%
Other 33 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2018.
All research outputs
#945,670
of 12,662,942 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#236
of 4,711 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,124
of 367,136 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#36
of 577 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,662,942 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,711 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 367,136 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 577 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.