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Differences in the way a mammalian cell and yeast cells coordinate cell growth and cell-cycle progression.

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Biology, January 2003
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Citations

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Readers on

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183 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
Title
Differences in the way a mammalian cell and yeast cells coordinate cell growth and cell-cycle progression.
Published in
Journal of Biology, January 2003
DOI 10.1186/1475-4924-2-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Conlon, Ian, Raff, Martin

Abstract

It is widely believed that cell-size checkpoints help to coordinate cell growth and cell-cycle progression, so that proliferating eukaryotic cells maintain their size. There is strong evidence for such size checkpoints in yeasts, which maintain a constant cell-size distribution as they proliferate, even though large yeast cells grow faster than small yeast cells. Moreover, when yeast cells are shifted to better or worse nutrient conditions, they alter their size threshold within one cell cycle. Populations of mammalian cells can also maintain a constant size distribution as they proliferate, but it is not known whether this depends on cell-size checkpoints.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 183 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 3%
Germany 3 2%
Israel 2 1%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Unknown 171 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 51 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 50 27%
Professor 16 9%
Student > Master 15 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 14 8%
Other 28 15%
Unknown 9 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 107 58%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 31 17%
Engineering 8 4%
Physics and Astronomy 7 4%
Chemistry 6 3%
Other 11 6%
Unknown 13 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2003.
All research outputs
#4,813,150
of 8,887,976 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Biology
#69
of 90 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,514,307
of 8,258,997 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Biology
#68
of 91 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,887,976 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 90 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.6. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 8,258,997 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 91 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.