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Doctors’ learning experiences in end-of-life care – a focus group study from nursing homes

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
72 Mendeley
Title
Doctors’ learning experiences in end-of-life care – a focus group study from nursing homes
Published in
BMC Medical Education, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12909-017-0865-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anette Fosse, Sabine Ruths, Kirsti Malterud, Margrethe Aase Schaufel

Abstract

Doctors often find dialogues about death difficult. In Norway, 45% of deaths take place in nursing homes. Newly qualified medical doctors serve as house officers in nursing homes during internship. Little is known about how nursing homes can become useful sites for learning about end-of-life care. The aim of this study was to explore newly qualified doctors' learning experiences with end-of-life care in nursing homes, especially focusing on dialogues about death. House officers in nursing homes (n = 16) participated in three focus group interviews. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed with systematic text condensation. Lave & Wenger's theory about situated learning was used to support interpretations, focusing on how the newly qualified doctors gained knowledge of end-of-life care through participation in the nursing home's community of practice. Newly qualified doctors explained how nursing home staff's attitudes taught them how calmness and acceptance could be more appropriate than heroic action when death was imminent. Shifting focus from disease treatment to symptom relief was demanding, yet participants comprehended situations where death could even be welcomed. Through challenging dialogues dealing with family members' hope and trust, they learnt how to adjust words and decisions according to family and patient's life story. Interdisciplinary role models helped them balance uncertainty and competence in the intermediate position of being in charge while also needing surveillance. There is a considerable potential for training doctors in EOL care in nursing homes, which can be developed and integrated in medical education. This practice based learning arena offers newly qualified doctors close interaction with patients, relatives and nurses, teaching them to perform difficult dialogues, individualize medical decisions and balance their professional role in an interdisciplinary setting.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 72 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 19%
Researcher 8 11%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Other 6 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 8%
Other 19 26%
Unknown 12 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 28%
Psychology 4 6%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 1%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 17 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2017.
All research outputs
#3,871,261
of 13,253,672 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#751
of 1,944 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#114,364
of 345,174 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,253,672 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,944 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 345,174 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them