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Hepatitis C-related hepatocellular carcinoma in the era of new generation antivirals

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
62 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
120 Mendeley
Title
Hepatitis C-related hepatocellular carcinoma in the era of new generation antivirals
Published in
BMC Medicine, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12916-017-0815-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas F. Baumert, Frank Jühling, Atsushi Ono, Yujin Hoshida

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus infection is a major cause of hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Interferon has been the major antiviral treatment, yielding viral clearance in approximately half of patients. New direct-acting antivirals substantially improved the cure rate to above 90%. However, access to therapies remains limited due to the high costs and under-diagnosis of infection in specific subpopulations, e.g., baby boomers, inmates, and injection drug users, and therefore, hepatocellular carcinoma incidence is predicted to increase in the next decades even in high-resource countries. Moreover, cancer risk persists even after 10 years of viral cure, and thus a clinical strategy for its monitoring is urgently needed. Several risk-predictive host factors, e.g., advanced liver fibrosis, older age, accompanying metabolic diseases such as diabetes, persisting hepatic inflammation, and elevated alpha-fetoprotein, as well as viral factors, e.g., core protein variants and genotype 3, have been reported. Indeed, a molecular signature in the liver has been associated with cancer risk even after viral cure. Direct-acting antivirals may affect cancer development and recurrence, which needs to be determined in further investigation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 120 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 119 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 17%
Student > Master 15 13%
Other 14 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 10%
Student > Bachelor 11 9%
Other 28 23%
Unknown 20 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 57 48%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 5%
Mathematics 3 3%
Other 9 8%
Unknown 27 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 April 2017.
All research outputs
#1,845,988
of 9,716,694 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#1,163
of 1,778 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,382
of 255,848 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#43
of 63 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,716,694 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,778 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 32.2. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,848 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 63 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.