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Role of community based savings groups (CBSGs) enhancing the utilization of community midwives in chitral district of Pakistan

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, October 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
54 Mendeley
Title
Role of community based savings groups (CBSGs) enhancing the utilization of community midwives in chitral district of Pakistan
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, October 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2393-13-185
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qayyum Ali Noorani, Iqbal Azam, Babar T Shaikh, Tharanga Ranasinghe, Shazia Abbas, Shakeela Wali, Paul Rippey, Wajiha Javed

Abstract

Maternal and infant mortality rates in the district of Chitral in Pakistan are alarmingly high. One of the major reasons for this is the inability of women to access skilled care due to the high costs associated with traveling and utilizing such services. The Aga Khan Health Services, Pakistan (AKHSP) in partnership with the national and provincial Maternal, Neonatal and Child Health (MNCH) program, deployed 28 community midwives (CMWs) in remote villages of Chitral district. This program has also established Community-Based Savings Groups (CBSGs) to support and facilitate access to MNCH services, in particular those delivered by the CMWs. CBSGs are a simple yet cost-effective and sustainable means of providing basic financial services to low income, marginalized, rural populations.The link between CBSGs and utilization of MNCH services is not well understood. This study will assess the relationship between women membership of CBSGs and their utilization of MNCH services, specifically those offered by CMWs, in the community.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Peru 1 2%
Uganda 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 51 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 35%
Student > Master 8 15%
Unspecified 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 14 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 24%
Social Sciences 13 24%
Unspecified 9 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 5 9%
Other 9 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2013.
All research outputs
#1,870,427
of 4,507,509 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#649
of 1,124 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,911
of 101,026 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#32
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,509 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,124 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 101,026 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.