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Psychological predictors of change in the number of musculoskeletal pain sites among Norwegian employees: a prospective study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#31 of 2,765)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
111 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
Title
Psychological predictors of change in the number of musculoskeletal pain sites among Norwegian employees: a prospective study
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1503-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jan Olav Christensen, Sissel Johansen, Stein Knardahl

Abstract

The pathogenesis of syndromes of widespread musculoskeletal pain remains an enigma. The present study sought to determine if psychological states, job satisfaction, pain intensity, and sleep problems contributed to the spread and decline of the number of musculoskeletal pains. A sample of 2989 Norwegian employees completed a questionnaire at baseline and follow-up 2 years later. Data were analyzed with multinomial and ordinal logistic regression analyses to determine effects on direction and degree of change of number of pain sites (NPS). After adjustment for sex, age, skill level, and number of pain sites at baseline, increases in the number of pain sites from baseline to follow-up were predicted by emotional exhaustion, mental distress, having little surplus, feeling down and sad, sleep disturbances, and intensity of headache. Decreases were predicted by low levels of emotional exhaustion, mental distress, sleep disturbances, restlessness, and lower intensity of headache, neck pain, shoulder pain, and back pain. Higher numbers of pain sites at baseline were associated with reduction of number of pain sites and lower likelihood of spread. Some factors that did not predict whether decrease or increase occurred were nevertheless associated with the degree of decrease (depression, anxiety, having surplus, self-efficacy) or increase (anxiety). Several psychological and physiological factors predicted change in the number of pain sites. There is a need for further investigations to identify possible mechanisms by which psychological and behavioral factors propagate the spread of pain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 111 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 13%
Student > Postgraduate 6 11%
Student > Master 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Other 12 22%
Unknown 8 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 14 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 20%
Unspecified 4 7%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Psychology 3 5%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 13 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 69. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 April 2018.
All research outputs
#262,208
of 13,956,678 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#31
of 2,765 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,454
of 264,046 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,956,678 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,765 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,046 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them