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Self-administered physical exercise training as treatment of neck and shoulder pain among military helicopter pilots and crew: a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, April 2017
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Title
Self-administered physical exercise training as treatment of neck and shoulder pain among military helicopter pilots and crew: a randomized controlled trial
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1507-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mike Murray, Britt Lange, Bo Riebeling Nørnberg, Karen Søgaard, Gisela Sjøgaard

Abstract

Neck pain is frequent among military helicopter pilots and crew-members, and pain may influence individual health and work performance. The aim of this study was to examine if an exercise intervention could reduce neck pain among helicopter pilots and crew-members. Thirty-one pilots and thirty-eight crew-members were randomized to either an exercise-training-group (n = 35) or a reference-group (n = 34). The exercise-training-group received 20-weeks of specific neck/shoulder training. The reference-group received no training. Intensity of neck pain previous 3-months (scale 0-10). additional neck/shoulder pain intensity variables and pressure-pain-threshold in the trapezius muscle (TRA) and upper-neck-extensor muscles (UNE). Regular training adherence was defined as ≥1 training session a week. Statistical analyses performed were intention-to-treat and per-protocol. Students t-test was performed (p < 0.05). Intensity of neck pain previous 3-months at baseline was: 2.2 ± 1.8 and previous 7-days: 1.0 ± 1.5, and pressure-pain-threshold in TRA and UNE (right/left) was in kPa: 424 ± 187 / 434 ± 188 and 345 ± 157 / 371 ± 170 in the exercise-training-group, and 416 ± 177 / 405 ± 163 and 334 ± 147 / 335 ± 163 in the reference-group, with no differences between groups. Intention-to-treat-analysis revealed no significant between-group-differences in neck pain intensity and pressure-pain-threshold. Between-group-differences, including participants who trained regularly (n = 10) were also non-significant. Within-group-changes were significant among participants with regular training adherence in the exercise-training-group regarding intensity of neck pain previous 3-months (from 2.2 ± 0.6 to 1.3 ± 1.3, p = 0.019). Likewise, within the whole exercise-training-group, neck pain previous 7-days decreased (from 1.0 ± 1.4 to 0.6 ± 1.1, p = 0.024). Additional within-group-changes regarding pressure-pain-threshold in kPa were for the reference-group a reduction in TRA and UNE (right/left) to: 342 ± 143 / 332 ± 154 and 295 ± 116 / 292 ± 121 implying increased pain sensitivity, while for the exercise-training-group only a reduction in left TRA was seen: 311 ± 113. The exercise intervention did not reduce neck pain among helicopter pilots and crew-members as no significant between-group-differences were found. However, some trends were demonstrated as some neck pain intensity and sensitivity improved more within the exercise-training-group but not within the reference-group. The lack of effect may be due to low adherence since only ~ 1/3 of subjects in the exercise-training-group engaged in regular training which may be due to the self-administration of the training. Ethical committee of Southern Denmark (S-20120121) 29 August, 2012. Clinical Trail Registration ( NCT01926262 ) 16 August, 2013.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 19%
Student > Bachelor 12 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 12%
Researcher 8 12%
Other 5 7%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 13 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 24 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Sports and Recreations 3 4%
Engineering 3 4%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 15 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 March 2018.
All research outputs
#11,309,301
of 12,713,955 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#2,319
of 2,528 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,923
of 258,528 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
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