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Disrupting rhythms in Plasmodium chabaudi: costs accrue quickly and independently of how infections are initiated

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2013
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Title
Disrupting rhythms in Plasmodium chabaudi: costs accrue quickly and independently of how infections are initiated
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-12-372
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aidan J O’Donnell, Nicole Mideo, Sarah E Reece

Abstract

In the blood, the synchronous malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi, exhibits a cell-cycle rhythm of approximately 24 hours in which transitions between developmental stages occur at particular times of day in the rodent host. Previous experiments reveal that when the timing of the parasite's cell-cycle rhythm is perturbed relative to the circadian rhythm of the host, parasites suffer a (~50%) reduction in asexual stages and gametocytes. Why it matters for parasites to have developmental schedules in synchronization with the host's rhythm is unknown. The experiment presented here investigates this issue by: (a) validating that the performance of P. chabaudi is negatively affected by mismatch to the host circadian rhythm; (b) testing whether the effect of mismatch depends on the route of infection or the developmental stage of inoculated parasites; and, (c) examining whether the costs of mismatch are due to challenges encountered upon initial infection and/or due to ongoing circadian host processes operating during infection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 44 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 22%
Researcher 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Other 3 7%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 4 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 53%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 November 2013.
All research outputs
#2,016,824
of 3,628,675 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#832
of 1,320 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,618
of 97,667 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#44
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,628,675 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,320 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.