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Social determinants of antibiotic misuse: a qualitative study of community members in Haryana, India

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2017
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Title
Social determinants of antibiotic misuse: a qualitative study of community members in Haryana, India
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4261-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna K. Barker, Kelli Brown, Muneeb Ahsan, Sharmila Sengupta, Nasia Safdar

Abstract

Antibiotic resistance is a global public health crisis. In India alone, multi-drug resistant organisms are responsible for over 58,000 infant deaths each year. A major driver of drug resistance is antibiotic misuse, which is a pervasive phenomenon worldwide. Due to a shortage of trained doctors, access to licensed allopathic doctors is limited in India's villages. Pharmacists and unlicensed medical providers are commonly the primary sources of healthcare. Patients themselves are also key participants in the decision to treat an illness with antibiotics. Thus, better understanding of the patient-provider interactions that may contribute to patients' inappropriate use of antibiotics is critical to reducing these practices in urban and rural Indian villages. We conducted a qualitative study of the social determinants of antibiotic use among twenty community members in Haryana, India. Semi-structured interview questions focused on two domains: typical antibiotic use and the motivation behind these practices. A cross-sectional pilot survey investigated the same twenty participants' understanding and usage of antibiotics. Interview and open-ended survey responses were translated, transcribed, and coded for themes. Antibiotics and the implications of their misuse were poorly understood by study participants. No participant was able to correctly define the term antibiotics. Participants with limited access to an allopathic doctor, either for logistic or economic reasons, were more likely to purchase medications directly from a pharmacy without a prescription. Low income participants were also more likely to prematurely stop antibiotics after symptoms subsided. Regardless of income, participants were more likely to seek an allopathic doctor for their children than for themselves. The prevalent misuse of antibiotics among these community members reinforces the importance of conducting research to develop effective strategies for stemming the tide of antibiotic resistance in India's villages.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 83 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 19%
Unspecified 13 16%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Researcher 8 10%
Other 13 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 24%
Unspecified 17 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 8 10%
Psychology 5 6%
Other 24 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2017.
All research outputs
#9,110,114
of 11,379,716 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,682
of 7,775 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#189,533
of 264,658 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#166
of 189 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,379,716 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,775 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,658 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 189 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.