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Acromegaly

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, June 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
5 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
177 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
242 Mendeley
Title
Acromegaly
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, June 2008
DOI 10.1186/1750-1172-3-17
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philippe Chanson, Sylvie Salenave

Abstract

Acromegaly is an acquired disorder related to excessive production of growth hormone (GH) and characterized by progressive somatic disfigurement (mainly involving the face and extremities) and systemic manifestations. The prevalence is estimated at 1:140,000-250,000. It is most often diagnosed in middle-aged adults (average age 40 years, men and women equally affected). Due to insidious onset and slow progression, acromegaly is often diagnosed four to more than ten years after its onset. The main clinical features are broadened extremities (hands and feet), widened thickened and stubby fingers, and thickened soft tissue. The facial aspect is characteristic and includes a widened and thickened nose, prominent cheekbones, forehead bulges, thick lips and marked facial lines. The forehead and overlying skin is thickened, sometimes leading to frontal bossing. There is a tendency towards mandibular overgrowth with prognathism, maxillary widening, tooth separation and jaw malocclusion. The disease also has rheumatologic, cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic consequences which determine its prognosis. In the majority of cases, acromegaly is related to a pituitary adenoma, either purely GH-secreting (60%) or mixed. In very rare cases, acromegaly is due to ectopic secretion of growth-hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) responsible for pituitary hyperplasia. The clinical diagnosis is confirmed biochemically by an increased serum GH concentration following an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and by detection of increased levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Assessment of tumor volume and extension is based on imaging studies. Echocardiography and sleep apnea testing are used to determine the clinical impact of acromegaly. Treatment is aimed at correcting (or preventing) tumor compression by excising the disease-causing lesion, and at reducing GH and IGF-I levels to normal values. Transsphenoidal surgery is often the first-line treatment. When surgery fails to correct GH/IGF-I hypersecretion, medical treatment with somatostatin analogs and/or radiotherapy can be used. The GH antagonist (pegvisomant) is used in patients that are resistant to somatostatin analogs. Adequate hormonal disease control is achieved in most cases, allowing a life expectancy similar to that of the general population. However, even if patients are cured or well-controlled, sequelae (joint pain, deformities and altered quality of life) often remain.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 242 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 239 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 44 18%
Student > Master 33 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 10%
Researcher 22 9%
Other 22 9%
Other 48 20%
Unknown 48 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 114 47%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 8 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 2%
Other 20 8%
Unknown 56 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 January 2022.
All research outputs
#6,739,185
of 21,468,133 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#964
of 2,414 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,455
of 304,853 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#65
of 148 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,468,133 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 67th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,414 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 304,853 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 148 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.