↓ Skip to main content

Absence of evidence or evidence of absence: reflecting on therapeutic implementations of attentional bias modification

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, January 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
135 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
162 Mendeley
Title
Absence of evidence or evidence of absence: reflecting on therapeutic implementations of attentional bias modification
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-244x-14-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Patrick JF Clarke, Lies Notebaert, Colin MacLeod

Abstract

Attentional bias modification (ABM) represents one of a number of cognitive bias modification techniques which are beginning to show promise as therapeutic interventions for emotional pathology. Numerous studies with both clinical and non-clinical populations have now demonstrated that ABM can reduce emotional vulnerability. However, some recent studies have failed to achieve change in either selective attention or emotional vulnerability using ABM methodologies, including a recent randomised controlled trial by Carlbring et al. Some have sought to represent such absence of evidence as a sound basis not to further pursue ABM as an online intervention. While these findings obviously raise questions about the specific conditions under which ABM procedures will produce therapeutic benefits, we suggest that the failure of some studies to modify selective attention does not challenge the theoretical and empirical basis of ABM. The present paper seeks to put these ABM failures in perspective within the broader context of attentional bias modification research. In doing so it is apparent that the current findings and future prospects of ABM are in fact very promising, suggesting that more research in this area is warranted, not less.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 162 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Netherlands 2 1%
Russia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Unknown 152 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 27%
Student > Master 28 17%
Researcher 25 15%
Student > Bachelor 14 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 5%
Other 28 17%
Unknown 16 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 113 70%
Neuroscience 7 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 2%
Social Sciences 2 1%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 <1%
Other 4 2%
Unknown 31 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 December 2015.
All research outputs
#5,243,160
of 10,467,089 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#1,394
of 2,558 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,436
of 209,184 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#47
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,467,089 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,558 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 209,184 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.