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The potential of task-shifting in scaling up services for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV: a time and motion study in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)

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7 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

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42 Mendeley
Title
The potential of task-shifting in scaling up services for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV: a time and motion study in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Published in
Human Resources for Health, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12960-017-0207-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Helga Naburi, Anna Mia Ekström, Phares Mujinja, Charles Kilewo, Karim Manji, Gunnel Biberfeld, David Sando, Guerino Chalamila, Till Bärnighausen

Abstract

In many African countries, prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) services are predominantly delivered by nurses. Although task-shifting is not yet well established, community health workers (CHWs) are often informally used as part of PMTCT delivery. According to the 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) Task-shifting Guidelines, many PMTCT tasks can be shifted from nurses to CHWs. The aim of this time and motion study in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, was to estimate the potential of task-shifting in PMTCT service delivery to reduce nurses' workload and health system costs. The time used by nurses to accomplish PMTCT activities during antenatal care (ANC) and postnatal care (PNC) visits was measured. These data were then used to estimate the costs that could be saved by shifting tasks from nurses to CHWs in the Tanzanian public-sector health system. A total of 1121 PMTCT-related tasks carried out by nurses involving 179 patients at ANC and PNC visits were observed at 26 health facilities. The average time of the first ANC visit was the longest, 54 (95% confidence interval (CI) 42-65) min, followed by the first PNC visit which took 29 (95% CI 26-32) minutes on average. ANC and PNC follow-up visits were substantially shorter, 15 (95% CI 14-17) and 13 (95% CI 11-16) minutes, respectively. During both the first and the follow-up ANC visits, 94% of nurses' time could be shifted to CHWs, while 84% spent on the first PNC visit and 100% of the time spent on the follow-up PNC visit could be task-shifted. Depending on CHW salary estimates, the cost savings due to task-shifting in PMTCT ranged from US$ 1.3 to 2.0 (first ANC visit), US$ 0.4 to 0.6 (ANC follow-up visit), US$ 0.7 to 1.0 (first PNC visit), and US$ 0.4 to 0.5 (PNC follow-up visit). Nurses working in PMTCT spend large proportions of their time on tasks that could be shifted to CHWs. Such task-shifting could allow nurses to spend more time on specialized PMTCT tasks and can substantially reduce the average cost per PMTCT patient.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 29%
Unspecified 7 17%
Student > Postgraduate 5 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 11 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 26%
Unspecified 7 17%
Social Sciences 4 10%
Psychology 3 7%
Other 6 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 July 2017.
All research outputs
#2,897,243
of 11,437,561 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#349
of 611 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,516
of 266,058 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#12
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,437,561 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 611 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,058 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.