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Design of a syndemic based intervention to facilitate care for men who have sex with men with high risk behaviour: the syn.bas.in randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
80 Mendeley
Title
Design of a syndemic based intervention to facilitate care for men who have sex with men with high risk behaviour: the syn.bas.in randomized controlled trial
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2474-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Roel C. A. Achterbergh, Jannie J. van der Helm, Wim van den Brink, Henry J. C. de Vries

Abstract

Men who have sex with men (MSM) constitute a risk group for sexual transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV. Despite counselling interventions, risk behaviour remains high. Syndemic theory holds that psychosocial problems often co-occur, interact and mutually reinforce each other, thereby increasing high risk behaviours and co-occurring diseases. Therefore, if co-occurring psychosocial problems were assessed and treated simultaneously, this might decrease high risk behaviour and disease. An open label randomized controlled trial will be conducted among 150 MSM with high risk behaviour recruited from the STI clinic of Amsterdam. Inclusion criteria are: HIV negative MSM with two STI and/or PEP treatment in the last 24 months, or HIV positive MSM with one STI in the last 24 months. All participants get questionnaires on the following syndemic domains: ADHD, depression, anxiety disorder, alexithymia and sex- and drug addiction. Participants in the control group receive standard care: STI screenings every three months and motivational interviewing based counselling. Participants in the experimental group receive standard care plus feedback based on the results of the questionnaires. All participants can be referred to co-located mental health or addiction services. The primary outcome is help seeking behaviour for mental health problems and/or drug use problems. The secondary outcomes are STI incidence and changes in sexual risk behaviour (i.e. condom use, number of anal sex partners, drug use during sex). This study will provide information on syndemic domains among MSM who show high risk behaviour and on the effect of screening and referral on help seeking behaviour and health (behaviour) outcomes. Trial Registration at clinicaltrail.gov, identifier NCT02859935 .

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 80 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 80 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 17 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 13%
Researcher 10 13%
Student > Master 9 11%
Other 24 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 23 29%
Psychology 21 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 8%
Social Sciences 6 8%
Other 6 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 September 2017.
All research outputs
#3,847,897
of 13,381,509 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,297
of 4,982 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,122
of 267,865 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,381,509 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,982 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,865 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them