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Spatial patterns of childhood diarrhea in Ethiopia: data from Ethiopian demographic and health surveys (2000, 2005, and 2011)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
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Title
Spatial patterns of childhood diarrhea in Ethiopia: data from Ethiopian demographic and health surveys (2000, 2005, and 2011)
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2504-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Getahun Gebre Bogale, Kassahun Alemu Gelaye, Degefie Tibebe Degefie, Yalemzewod Assefa Gelaw

Abstract

Childhood diarrhea is a major public health problem, especially in developing countries, including Ethiopia. Exploring the spatial pattern of childhood diarrhea is important to monitor and design effective intervention programs. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the spatial patterns of childhood diarrhea in Ethiopia over the past one decade. A total of 29,358 under-five children were retrieved from three consecutive Ethiopian demographic and health surveys (2000, 2005, and 2011) and included into the study. Spatial cluster and autocorrelation analysis was done to explore the patterns of childhood diarrhea. Childhood diarrhea clustered spatially at a national level in all survey periods (Moran's I: 0.3830-1.3296, p < 0.05). Significant spatial clusters were found in different survey periods across the regions. The most likely spatial clusters were found in Southern Nations Nationalities and people, West Oromia, Gambella, Benshangul-Gumuz, and Somali regions. Childhood diarrhea also clustered at the border areas of Southern Nations Nationalities and People and Tigray, Central Somali and Western Oromia, Gambella and Amhara (West Gojam, Awi, Oromia, and Wag Himra) regions. In 2000, the most likely clusters were found in Southern Nations Nationalities and People, West Oromia, and Gambella regions (LLR = 55.37, p < 0.001); in 2005, at Southern Nations Nationalities and People (LLR: 45.69, p < 0.001); and in 2011, at Gambella, West Southern Nations Nationalities and People and Oromia, and Benshangul-Gumuz regions (LLR: 51.09, p < 0.001). In this study, childhood diarrhea remains public health problem and had a spatial variation across the regions. Identifying the risk areas would help in designing effective interventions to reduce childhood diarrhea in these areas.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 23%
Unspecified 6 19%
Researcher 4 13%
Lecturer 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 9 29%
Unspecified 8 26%
Environmental Science 4 13%
Mathematics 3 10%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Other 5 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 June 2017.
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#10,095,360
of 11,383,682 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,725
of 4,230 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,199
of 263,497 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#79
of 109 outputs
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