↓ Skip to main content

Measuring individual hierarchy of anxiety invoking sports related activities: development and validation of the Photographic Series of Sports Activities for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction (P…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, July 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
41 Mendeley
Title
Measuring individual hierarchy of anxiety invoking sports related activities: development and validation of the Photographic Series of Sports Activities for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction (PHOSA-ACLR)
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1643-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wim van Lankveld, Nicky van Melick, Bas Habets, Eefje Roelofsen, J. Bart Staal, Robert van Cingel

Abstract

Fear of harm (FoH) after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction (ACLR) should be addressed in physical therapy as it hampers return to sports. However, there are no instruments assessing FoH specific for ACLR. The objective of this study is to describe the development and measurement properties of the Photograph Series of Sports Activities for ACLR (PHOSA-ACLR) measuring ACL injury related FoH. Based on literature and opinion of physical therapists with extensive experience in ACLR treatment, photographs depicting FoH inducing situations in ACL injury were considered for inclusion in the instrument. For each photograph the patients is asked to report perceived harmfulness. The set of photographs was completed by two samples of patients with ACLR: 1 cross-sectional sample (n = 55), and 1 test-retest reliability sample (n = 58). Internal consistency and structural validity were assessed in 109 patients. In 58 patients criterion validity was assessed by calculating pearson correlations with the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK). Correlations with self-reported knee function (KOOS and Lysholm score), and Knee Self-efficacy Scale (K-SES) were computed for hypothesis testing. Test-retest reliability was determined in a group of 55 patients, assessed twice with 1 week between assessments. Twelve photographs depicting sports related movements that are likely to invoke FoH after ACLR were selected. Two items were deleted because of lack of discrimination. The remaining 10 items were included in the PHOSA-ACLR, and the scale showed excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's Alpha is .95). Items reflected one dimension, and was strongly correlated with TSK (r = .59). A priori formulated hypotheses are confirmed and test-retest correlation was excellent (ICC = .86). The PHOSA-ACLR showed acceptable measurement properties. The PHOSA-ACLR gives specific information about fear invoking sports situations that are not measured by other kinesophobia measures. Therefore, the PHOSA-ACLR might be a valuable additional tool in rehabilitation of ACLR patients. Additional research is needed to determine responsiveness to change.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 27%
Student > Bachelor 9 22%
Unspecified 7 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Researcher 4 10%
Other 4 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 13 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 27%
Sports and Recreations 2 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 3 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 January 2019.
All research outputs
#7,160,856
of 13,255,897 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,232
of 2,635 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#114,317
of 263,058 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,255,897 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,635 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,058 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them