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Single leg squat performance in physically and non-physically active individuals: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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67 Mendeley
Title
Single leg squat performance in physically and non-physically active individuals: a cross-sectional study
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1660-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Silvia Gianola, Greta Castellini, Elena Stucovitz, Alice Nardo, Giuseppe Banfi

Abstract

Single-leg squat (SLS) is a functional test visually rated by clinicians for assessing lower limb function as a preventive injury strategy. SLS clinical rating is a qualitative evaluation and it does not count objective outcomes as kinematics data and surface electromyography (sEMG) assessment. Based on the SLS rating, the aims of this study were (i) to determine the clinical rating agreement among six raters and (ii) to assess kinematic and sEMG predictors of good SLS performance in physically and non-physically active individuals. Seventy-two healthy adults, divided in physically active and non-physically active groups, performed three SLSs on their dominant leg. Clinical ratings, kinematic data and sEMG were acquired. By using a validated clinical scale, six expert clinicians rated each SLS watching a video at three different time points. Intra and inter-rater agreement of clinical ratings were undertaken and a binary logistic regression analysis was used to determine kinematic and sEMG as predictors of SLS performance. The weighted kappa coefficient for intra-rater reliability within each rater ranged between moderate and almost perfect agreement (0.55-0.85) whereas the weighted kappa coefficient for inter-rater reliability among raters was fair (0.34, time point 0; 0.31, time point 1; 0.30, time point 2). SLS analyses of physically active compared to non-physically active group showed a statistically significant difference in knee flexion and hip flexion (p = 0.041 and p = 0.023 respectively) and no difference in clinical ratings (p = 0.081). Greater knee flexion can predict the good SLS performance taking into account the belonging group (p = 0.019). Physically active individuals seemed to be at less risk to perform a non-good SLS and they had greater knee and hip flexions kinematics than non-physically active individuals. Knee flexion can predict the SLS performance quality therefore a greater knee flexion might also be considered a protective element from injuries. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (trial has been registred retrospectively: NCT03203083. Date registration: June 21, 2017.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 24%
Student > Master 15 22%
Student > Postgraduate 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 7%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 10 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 33%
Sports and Recreations 14 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 21%
Engineering 3 4%
Psychology 1 1%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 11 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2018.
All research outputs
#3,941,597
of 13,434,786 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#928
of 2,655 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,686
of 262,278 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,434,786 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,655 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,278 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them