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Gelam honey attenuated radiation-induced cell death in human diploid fibroblasts by promoting cell cycle progression and inhibiting apoptosis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, March 2014
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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13 Mendeley
Title
Gelam honey attenuated radiation-induced cell death in human diploid fibroblasts by promoting cell cycle progression and inhibiting apoptosis
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, March 2014
DOI 10.1186/1472-6882-14-108
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tengku Ahbrizal Farizal Tengku Ahmad, Faizul Jaafar, Zakiah Jubri, Khairuddin Abdul Rahim, Nor Fadilah Rajab, Suzana Makpol

Abstract

The interaction between ionizing radiation and substances in cells will induce the production of free radicals. These free radicals inflict damage to important biomolecules such as chromosomes, proteins and lipids which consequently trigger the expression of genes which are involved in protecting the cells or repair the oxidative damages. Honey has been known for its antioxidant properties and was used in medical and cosmetic products. Currently, research on honey is ongoing and diversifying. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of Gelam honey as a radioprotector in human diploid fibroblast (HDFs) which were exposed to gamma-rays by determining the expression of genes and proteins involved in cell cycle regulation and cell death.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 8%
United Kingdom 1 8%
Unknown 11 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 23%
Student > Master 3 23%
Student > Postgraduate 2 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 15%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 15%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 March 2014.
All research outputs
#2,876,950
of 4,507,778 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1,024
of 1,452 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,202
of 106,941 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#38
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,778 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,452 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 106,941 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.