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Anxiety and depression among infertile women: a cross-sectional survey from Hungary

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Women's Health, July 2017
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
83 Mendeley
Title
Anxiety and depression among infertile women: a cross-sectional survey from Hungary
Published in
BMC Women's Health, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12905-017-0410-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Enikő Lakatos, Judit F Szigeti, Péter P Ujma, Réka Sexty, Piroska Balog

Abstract

Infertility is often associated with a chronic state of stress which may manifest itself in anxiety-related and depressive symptoms. The aim of our study is to assess the psychological state of women with and without fertility problems, and to investigate the background factors of anxiety-related and depressive symptoms in women struggling with infertility. Our study was conducted with the participation of 225 (134 primary infertile and 91 fertile) women, recruited in a clinical setting and online. We used the following questionnaires: Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T), Shortened Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI). We also interviewed our subjects on the presence of other sources of stress (the quality of the relationship with their mother, financial and illness-related stress), and we described sociodemographic and fertility-specific characteristics. We tested our hypotheses using independent-samples t-tests (M ± SD) and multiple linear regression modelling (ß). Infertile women were younger (33.30 ± 4.85 vs. 35.74 ± 5.73, p = .001), but had significantly worse psychological well-being (BDI = 14.94 ± 12.90 vs. 8.95 ± 10.49, p < .0001; STAI-T = 48.76 ± 10.96 vs. 41.18 ± 11.26, p < .0001) than fertile subjects. Depressive symptoms and anxiety in infertile women were associated with age, social concern, sexual concern and maternal relationship stress. Trait anxiety was also associated with financial stress. Our model was able to account for 58% of the variance of depressive symptoms and 62% of the variance of trait anxiety. Depressive and anxiety-related symptoms of infertile women are more prominent than those of fertile females. The measurement of these indicators and the mitigation of underlying distress by adequate psychosocial interventions should be encouraged.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 83 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 20%
Student > Bachelor 14 17%
Student > Postgraduate 9 11%
Researcher 7 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 8%
Other 16 19%
Unknown 13 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 20%
Psychology 15 18%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 1%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 16 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 December 2017.
All research outputs
#7,405,345
of 12,330,736 outputs
Outputs from BMC Women's Health
#440
of 673 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#141,476
of 269,292 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Women's Health
#11
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,330,736 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 673 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,292 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.