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Saving mothers and newborns in communities: strengthening community midwives to provide high quality essential newborn and maternal care in Baluchistan, Pakistan in a financially sustainable manner

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, April 2014
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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92 Mendeley
Title
Saving mothers and newborns in communities: strengthening community midwives to provide high quality essential newborn and maternal care in Baluchistan, Pakistan in a financially sustainable manner
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, April 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-2393-14-131
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zubia Mumtaz, Andrea Cutherell, Afshan Bhatti

Abstract

To address it's persistently high maternal mortality rate of 276/100,000 live births, the government of Pakistan created a new cadre of community based midwives (CMW). One expectation is that CMWs will improve access to maternal health services for underserved women. Recent research shows the CMWs have largely failed to establish midwifery practices, because CMW's lack of skills, both clinical and entrepreneurial and funds necessary to develop their practice infrastructure and logistics. Communities also lack trust in their competence to conduct safe births. To address these issues, the Saving Mothers and Newborn (SMNC) intervention will implement three key elements to support the CMWs to establish their private practices: (1) upgrade CMW clinical skills (2) provide business-skills training and small loans (3) generate demand for CMW services using cellular phone SMS technology and existing women's support groups.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
Peru 1 1%
Bangladesh 1 1%
Unknown 88 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 27%
Researcher 21 23%
Unspecified 10 11%
Student > Postgraduate 8 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 9%
Other 20 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 32%
Unspecified 17 18%
Social Sciences 14 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 7 8%
Other 15 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2014.
All research outputs
#3,060,282
of 4,507,509 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#939
of 1,124 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#69,250
of 101,867 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#68
of 79 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,509 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,124 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 101,867 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 79 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.