↓ Skip to main content

Assessing the relevance, efficiency, and sustainability of HIV/AIDS in-service training in Nigeria

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, April 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
56 Mendeley
Title
Assessing the relevance, efficiency, and sustainability of HIV/AIDS in-service training in Nigeria
Published in
Human Resources for Health, April 2014
DOI 10.1186/1478-4491-12-20
Pubmed ID
Authors

Randi Burlew, Amanda Puckett, Rebecca Bailey, Margaret Caffrey, Stephanie Brantley

Abstract

More than three million people in Nigeria are living with HIV/AIDS. In order to reduce the HIV/AIDS burden in Nigeria, the US Government (USG) has dedicated significant resources to combating the epidemic through the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). In-service training (IST) of health workers is one of the most commonly used strategies to improve the quality and coverage of HIV/AIDS services. At USAID/Nigeria's request, the USAID-funded CapacityPlus project conducted an assessment of PEPFAR-funded IST for all cadres of health workers in Nigeria. Using the IST Improvement Framework, developed by the USAID Applying Sciences to Strengthen and Improve Systems Project (ASSIST), as a guide, the authors developed a survey tool to assess the efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability of IST provided between January 2007 and July 2012 by PEPFAR-funded implementing partners in Nigeria. The instrument was adapted to the Nigerian context and refined through a stakeholder engagement process. It was then distributed via an online platform to more than 50 PEPFAR-funded implementing partners who provided IST in Nigeria. A total of 39 implementing partners completed the survey. Our survey found that PEPFAR implementing partners have been providing a wide range of IST to a diverse group of health workers in Nigeria since 2007. Most trainings are developed using national curricula, manuals and/or other standard operating procedures. Many of the partners are conducting Training Needs Assessments to inform the planning, design and development of their training programs. However, the assessment also pointed to a number of recommendations to increase the efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability of PEPFAR-funded IST. These actions are as follows: improve collaboration and coordination among implementing partners; apply a more diverse and cost-effective set of training modalities; allocate funding specifically for the evaluation of the effectiveness of training; improve links between IST and both continuing professional development and pre-service education; require implementing partners to create sustainability plans to transition training from PEPFAR funding to other funding sources; and develop a training information management system to track key aspects of IST, such as the number and types of providers, courses, and participants of PEPFAR-funded IST.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 53 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 50%
Researcher 14 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 21%
Student > Postgraduate 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Other 19 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 55%
Social Sciences 15 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 23%
Business, Management and Accounting 7 13%
Unspecified 7 13%
Other 12 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 May 2014.
All research outputs
#3,459,254
of 13,469,606 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#427
of 732 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,656
of 189,693 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#5
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,469,606 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 732 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,693 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.