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Should Global Burden of Disease Estimates Include Depression as a Risk Factor for Coronary Heart Disease?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, May 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
43 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
71 Mendeley
Title
Should Global Burden of Disease Estimates Include Depression as a Risk Factor for Coronary Heart Disease?
Published in
BMC Medicine, May 2011
DOI 10.1186/1741-7015-9-47
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fiona J Charlson, Nicholas JC Stapelberg, Amanda J Baxter, Harvey A Whiteford

Abstract

The 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study estimates the premature mortality and disability of all major diseases and injuries. In addition it aims to quantify the risk that diseases and other factors play in the aetiology of disease and injuries. Mental disorders and coronary heart disease are both significant public health issues due to their high prevalence and considerable contribution to global disease burden. For the first time the Global Burden of Disease Study will aim to assess mental disorders as risk factors for coronary heart disease. We show here that current evidence satisfies established criteria for considering depression as an independent risk factor in development of coronary heart disease. A dose response relationship appears to exist and plausible biological pathways have been proposed. However, a number of challenges exist when conducting a rigorous assessment of the literature including heterogeneity issues, definition and measurement of depression and coronary heart disease, publication bias and residual confounding. Therefore, despite some limitations in the available data, it is now appropriate to consider major depression as a risk factor for coronary heart disease in the new Global Burden of Disease Study.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Uganda 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 66 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 24%
Student > Master 16 23%
Researcher 9 13%
Other 7 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 8%
Other 17 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 44%
Psychology 12 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 8%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Other 12 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 January 2017.
All research outputs
#2,014,108
of 8,903,958 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#1,238
of 1,705 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,606
of 179,899 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#46
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,903,958 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,705 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.5. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 179,899 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.