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A monitoring and feedback tool embedded in a counselling protocol to increase physical activity of patients with COPD or type 2 diabetes in primary care: study protocol of a three-arm cluster…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
187 Mendeley
Title
A monitoring and feedback tool embedded in a counselling protocol to increase physical activity of patients with COPD or type 2 diabetes in primary care: study protocol of a three-arm cluster randomised controlled trial
Published in
BMC Family Practice, May 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-15-93
Pubmed ID
Authors

Renée Verwey, Sanne van der Weegen, Marieke Spreeuwenberg, Huibert Tange, Trudy van der Weijden, Luc de Witte

Abstract

Physical activity is important for a healthy lifestyle. Although physical activity can delay complications and decrease the burden of the disease, the level of activity of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM2) is often far from optimal. To stimulate physical activity, a monitoring and feedback tool, consisting of an accelerometer linked to a smart phone and webserver (It's LiFe! tool), and a counselling protocol for practice nurses in primary care was developed (the Self-management Support Program). The main objective of this study is to measure the longitudinal effects of this counselling protocol and the added value of using the tool.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 187 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 2 1%
United States 2 1%
Italy 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 177 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 20%
Student > Master 37 20%
Student > Bachelor 26 14%
Researcher 19 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 7%
Other 35 19%
Unknown 18 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 61 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 35 19%
Psychology 15 8%
Social Sciences 15 8%
Computer Science 10 5%
Other 26 14%
Unknown 25 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 May 2014.
All research outputs
#6,662,603
of 12,373,620 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#665
of 1,233 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,401
of 191,773 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#9
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,620 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,233 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 191,773 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.