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The typically developing paediatric foot: how flat should it be? A systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#18 of 535)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
48 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
Title
The typically developing paediatric foot: how flat should it be? A systematic review
Published in
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13047-017-0218-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hayley Uden, Rolf Scharfbillig, Ryan Causby

Abstract

All typically developing children are born with flexible flat feet, progressively developing a medial longitudinal arch during the first decade of their lives. Whilst the child's foot is expected to be flat, there is currently no consensus as to how flat this foot should be. Furthermore, whilst feet are observed to decrease in flatness with increasing age, it is not known how flat they should be at each age increment. The objective of this systematic review is to define the postural characteristics of the 'typically' developing paediatric foot. The PRISMA protocol was applied to compare all data currently published describing the typical development of the paediatric foot. The Epidemiological Appraisal Instrument (EAI) was used to assess the risk of bias of the included studies. Thirty four epidemiological papers pertaining to the development of the paediatric foot were graphically compared. Sixteen different foot posture assessments were identified of which footprint based measures were the most reported outcome. Firstly, the use of the term normal in relation to foot posture is misleading in the categorisation of the paediatric foot, as indeed a flat foot posture is a normal finding at specific ages. Secondly, the foot posture of the developing child is indeed age dependent and has been shown to change over time. Thirdly, no firm conclusion could be reached as to which age the foot posture of children ceases to develop further, as no two foot measures are comparable, therefore future research needs to consider the development of consensus recommendations as to the measurement of the paediatric foot, using valid and reliable assessment tools.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 48 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 78 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 18%
Student > Master 14 18%
Student > Postgraduate 13 17%
Researcher 5 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 5%
Other 18 23%
Unknown 10 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 39 50%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 14%
Sports and Recreations 5 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 15 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 38. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 August 2018.
All research outputs
#440,277
of 13,333,056 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#18
of 535 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,215
of 265,389 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,333,056 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 535 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,389 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them