↓ Skip to main content

Causes, trends and severity of musculoskeletal injuries in Ghana

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, August 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
54 Mendeley
Title
Causes, trends and severity of musculoskeletal injuries in Ghana
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1709-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eric Lawer Torgbenu, Emmanuel K. Nakua, Henry Kyei, Eric Badu, Maxwell Peprah Opoku

Abstract

Musculoskeletal [MSK] injuries are common causes of long-term pain and physical disability which affect many people worldwide. The economic and social impacts on the individual, society and national health systems are enormous making a matter of public health concern. Therefore, this study examined the causes and extent of MSK injuries in a referral hospital in Ghana. A prospective study design with consecutive sampling method was used to recruit patients admitted at Trauma Unit as well as those receiving orthopaedic reviews at St. Joseph's Orthopaedic Hospital over a ten-month period. A structured questionnaire, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) were used to collect data which were analysed descriptively using SPSS version 20. A total of 269 MSK injury patients were identified - of these, 137 (50.9%) males with an average age of 38 years (SD = 19.88). Nearly half (49.1%) of the injuries sustained were fractures, and common causes were vehicular crash 113 (42.0%) and fall 68 (25.3%). Body parts affected most were the knee (19.62) and the mean levels of pain for all injuries were 6.04 ± 2.44 and 3.25 (±1.50) respectively. Ghana needs a healthy population to steer its development trajectory. Policy makers in Ghana should pay attention to both preventive as well as management of MSK injuries, or else, most of the country's working class could live with lasting effects of injuries which may have significant impacts on the economy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 26%
Student > Bachelor 9 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 13%
Researcher 4 7%
Other 3 6%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 11 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 19%
Sports and Recreations 3 6%
Psychology 2 4%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Other 9 17%
Unknown 14 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 August 2017.
All research outputs
#6,955,998
of 11,632,136 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,356
of 2,364 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,359
of 263,827 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#33
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,632,136 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,364 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,827 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.