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Understanding middle managers’ influence in implementing patient safety culture

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
13 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
Title
Understanding middle managers’ influence in implementing patient safety culture
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2533-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jennifer Gutberg, Whitney Berta

Abstract

The past fifteen years have been marked by large-scale change efforts undertaken by healthcare organizations to improve patient safety and patient-centered care. Despite substantial investment of effort and resources, many of these large-scale or "radical change" initiatives, like those in other industries, have enjoyed limited success - with practice and behavioural changes neither fully adopted nor ultimately sustained - which has in large part been ascribed to inadequate implementation efforts. Culture change to "patient safety culture" (PSC) is among these radical change initiatives, where results to date have been mixed at best. This paper responds to calls for research that focus on explicating factors that affect efforts to implement radical change in healthcare contexts, and focuses on PSC as the radical change implementation. Specifically, this paper offers a novel conceptual model based on Organizational Learning Theory to explain the ability of middle managers in healthcare organizations to influence patient safety culture change. We propose that middle managers can capitalize on their unique position between upper and lower levels in the organization and engage in 'ambidextrous' learning that is critical to implementing and sustaining radical change. This organizational learning perspective offers an innovative way of framing the mid-level managers' role, through both explorative and exploitative activities, which further considers the necessary organizational context in which they operate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 26%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 3 7%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 7 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 14 33%
Business, Management and Accounting 7 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 12%
Psychology 3 7%
Engineering 3 7%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 7 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2017.
All research outputs
#1,522,036
of 11,805,285 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#622
of 3,842 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,259
of 265,632 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#34
of 104 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,805,285 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,842 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,632 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 104 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.