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Increases in United States life expectancy through reductions in injury-related death

Overview of attention for article published in Population Health Metrics, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#25 of 270)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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19 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
24 Mendeley
Title
Increases in United States life expectancy through reductions in injury-related death
Published in
Population Health Metrics, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12963-017-0150-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Scott R. Kegler, Grant T. Baldwin, Rose A. Rudd, Michael F. Ballesteros

Abstract

During the previous century the average lifespan in the United States (US) increased by over 30 years, with much of this increase attributed to public health initiatives. This report examines further gains that might be achieved through reduced occurrence of injury-related death. US life tables and injury death rate data were used to estimate potential increases in life expectancy assuming various reductions in the rate of fatal injuries. Corresponding numbers of deaths potentially averted annually were also estimated; unit (per death) medical and lifetime work loss costs were employed to estimate total costs potentially averted annually. Through elimination of injury as a cause of death, average US life expectancy at birth could be increased by approximately 1.5 years, with notable variations by sex, ethnicity, and race. More conservatively, average life expectancy at birth could be increased by 0.41 years assuming that the national injury death rate could be brought into line with the lowest state-specific rate. Under this more conservative but plausible assumption, an estimated 48,400 injury deaths and $61 billion in medical and work loss costs would be averted annually. Increases in life expectancy of the magnitude considered in this report are arguably attainable based on long-term historical reductions in the US injury death rate, as well as significant continuing reductions seen in other developed countries. Contemporary evidence-based interventions can play an important role in reducing injury-related deaths, such as those due to drug overdoses and older adult falls, as well as suicides.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 21%
Student > Bachelor 4 17%
Student > Master 4 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Other 7 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 25%
Unspecified 5 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 13%
Social Sciences 3 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 13%
Other 4 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2017.
All research outputs
#888,708
of 11,862,957 outputs
Outputs from Population Health Metrics
#25
of 270 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,799
of 265,369 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Population Health Metrics
#1
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,862,957 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 270 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,369 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.