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The association between alcohol use, alcohol use disorders and tuberculosis (TB). A systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, December 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
189 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
277 Mendeley
connotea
2 Connotea
Title
The association between alcohol use, alcohol use disorders and tuberculosis (TB). A systematic review
Published in
BMC Public Health, December 2009
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-9-450
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jürgen Rehm, Andriy V Samokhvalov, Manuela G Neuman, Robin Room, Charles Parry, Knut Lönnroth, Jayadeep Patra, Vladimir Poznyak, Svetlana Popova

Abstract

In 2004, tuberculosis (TB) was responsible for 2.5% of global mortality (among men 3.1%; among women 1.8%) and 2.2% of global burden of disease (men 2.7%; women 1.7%). The present work portrays accumulated evidence on the association between alcohol consumption and TB with the aim to clarify the nature of the relationship. A systematic review of existing scientific data on the association between alcohol consumption and TB, and on studies relevant for clarification of causality was undertaken. There is a strong association between heavy alcohol use/alcohol use disorders (AUD) and TB. A meta-analysis on the risk of TB for these factors yielded a pooled relative risk of 2.94 (95% CI: 1.89-4.59). Numerous studies show pathogenic impact of alcohol on the immune system causing susceptibility to TB among heavy drinkers. In addition, there are potential social pathways linking AUD and TB. Heavy alcohol use strongly influences both the incidence and the outcome of the disease and was found to be linked to altered pharmacokinetics of medicines used in treatment of TB, social marginalization and drift, higher rate of re-infection, higher rate of treatment defaults and development of drug-resistant forms of TB. Based on the available data, about 10% of the TB cases globally were estimated to be attributable to alcohol. The epidemiological and other evidence presented indicates that heavy alcohol use/AUD constitute a risk factor for incidence and re-infection of TB. Consequences for prevention and clinical interventions are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 277 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
India 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Armenia 1 <1%
Zimbabwe 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Other 4 1%
Unknown 262 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 75 27%
Researcher 39 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 11%
Student > Bachelor 29 10%
Unspecified 28 10%
Other 75 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 143 52%
Unspecified 39 14%
Social Sciences 21 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 6%
Other 42 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2018.
All research outputs
#696,366
of 12,834,493 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#746
of 8,740 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,402
of 188,216 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,834,493 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,740 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,216 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them