↓ Skip to main content

The global burden of liver disease: a challenge for methods and for public health

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, September 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#31 of 2,065)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
47 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
80 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
173 Mendeley
Title
The global burden of liver disease: a challenge for methods and for public health
Published in
BMC Medicine, September 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12916-014-0159-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter Byass

Abstract

New Global Burden of Disease estimates for liver cirrhosis, published in BMC Medicine, suggest that cirrhosis caused over a million deaths in 2010, with a further million due to liver cancer and acute hepatitis. Cause-specific mortality data were very sparse for some regions, particularly in Africa, with no relevant mortality data for 58/187 countries. Liver disease involves infectious, malignant and chronic aetiologies with overlapping symptoms. Where available mortality data come from verbal autopsies, separating different types of liver disease is challenging. Cirrhosis is a disease of rich and poor alike; key public health risk factors such as alcohol consumption play an important role. Risk-reduction strategies such as controlling the price of alcohol are being widely discussed. Since these estimates used alcohol consumption as a covariate, they cannot be used to explore relationships between alcohol consumption and cirrhosis mortality. There is hope: coming generations of adults will have been vaccinated against hepatitis B, and this is envisaged to reduce the burden of fatal liver disease. But more complete civil registration globally is needed to fully understand the burden of liver disease.Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/12/145/abstract.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 173 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Egypt 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 166 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 16%
Researcher 25 14%
Student > Bachelor 24 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 13%
Student > Postgraduate 19 11%
Other 32 18%
Unknown 22 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 63 36%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 6%
Engineering 10 6%
Other 29 17%
Unknown 31 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 385. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 May 2018.
All research outputs
#25,546
of 12,936,827 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#31
of 2,065 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#407
of 208,224 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,936,827 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,065 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 34.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 208,224 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.