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Incentives for retaining and motivating health workers in Pacific and Asian countries

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, September 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
3 policy sources

Citations

dimensions_citation
129 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
345 Mendeley
Title
Incentives for retaining and motivating health workers in Pacific and Asian countries
Published in
Human Resources for Health, September 2008
DOI 10.1186/1478-4491-6-18
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lyn N Henderson, Jim Tulloch

Abstract

This paper was initiated by the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) after identifying the need for an in-depth synthesis and analysis of available literature and information on incentives for retaining health workers in the Asia-Pacific region. The objectives of this paper are to: 1. Highlight the situation of health workers in Pacific and Asian countries to gain a better understanding of the contributing factors to health worker motivation, dissatisfaction and migration. 2. Examine the regional and global evidence on initiatives to retain a competent and motivated health workforce, especially in rural and remote areas. 3. Suggest ways to address the shortages of health workers in Pacific and Asian countries by using incentives. The review draws on literature and information gathered through a targeted search of websites and databases. Additional reports were gathered through AusAID country offices, UN agencies, and non-government organizations. The severe shortage of health workers in Pacific and Asian countries is a critical issue that must be addressed through policy, planning and implementation of innovative strategies--such as incentives--for retaining and motivating health workers. While economic factors play a significant role in the decisions of workers to remain in the health sector, evidence demonstrates that they are not the only factors. Research findings from the Asia-Pacific region indicate that salaries and benefits, together with working conditions, supervision and management, and education and training opportunities are important. The literature highlights the importance of packaging financial and non-financial incentives. Each country facing shortages of health workers needs to identify the underlying reasons for the shortages, determine what motivates health workers to remain in the health sector, and evaluate the incentives required for maintaining a competent and motivated health workforce. Decision-making factors and responses to financial and non-financial incentives have not been adequately monitored and evaluated in the Asia-Pacific region. Efforts must be made to build the evidence base so that countries can develop appropriate workforce strategies and incentive packages.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 345 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
India 2 <1%
Indonesia 2 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Other 7 2%
Unknown 325 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 120 35%
Researcher 46 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 36 10%
Student > Postgraduate 31 9%
Student > Bachelor 27 8%
Other 61 18%
Unknown 24 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 132 38%
Social Sciences 49 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 34 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 31 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 4%
Other 46 13%
Unknown 38 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2016.
All research outputs
#1,754,977
of 13,778,239 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#246
of 745 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,746
of 233,091 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#19
of 65 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,778,239 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 745 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,091 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.