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“Helping my neighbour is like giving a loan…” –the role of social relations in chronic illness in rural Uganda

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
12 Mendeley
Title
“Helping my neighbour is like giving a loan…” –the role of social relations in chronic illness in rural Uganda
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2666-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jovita Amurwon, Flora Hajdu, Dominic Bukenya Yiga, Janet Seeley

Abstract

Understanding individuals' experience of accessing care and tending to various other needs during chronic illness in a rural context is important for health systems aiming to increase access to healthcare and protect poor populations from unreasonable financial hardship. This study explored the impact on households of access to free healthcare and how they managed to meet needs during chronic illness. Rich data from the life stories of individuals from 22 households in rural south-western Uganda collected in 2009 were analysed. The data revealed that individuals and households depend heavily on their social relations in order to meet their needs during illness, including accessing the free healthcare and maintaining vital livelihood activities. The life stories illustrated ways in which households draw upon social relations to achieve the broader social protection necessary to prevent expenses becoming catastrophic, but also demonstrated the uncertainty in relying solely on informal relations. Improving access to healthcare in a rural context greatly depends on broader social protection. Thus, the informal social protection that already exists in the form of strong reciprocal social relations must be acknowledged, supported and included in health policy planning.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 33%
Student > Postgraduate 2 17%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Other 3 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 5 42%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 17%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 8%
Decision Sciences 1 8%
Other 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 January 2018.
All research outputs
#3,404,036
of 13,181,286 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#1,652
of 4,393 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,545
of 310,524 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#196
of 534 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,181,286 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,393 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 310,524 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 534 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.