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Differences in medication knowledge and risk of errors between graduating nursing students and working registered nurses: comparative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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82 Mendeley
Title
Differences in medication knowledge and risk of errors between graduating nursing students and working registered nurses: comparative study
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12913-014-0580-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bjoerg O Simonsen, Gro K Daehlin, Inger Johansson, Per G Farup

Abstract

BackgroundNurses experience insufficient medication knowledge; particularly in drug dose calculations, but also in drug management and pharmacology. The weak knowledge could be a result of deficiencies in the basic nursing education, or lack of continuing maintenance training during working years. The aim of this study was to compare the medication knowledge, certainty and risk of error between graduating bachelor students in nursing and experienced registered nurses.MethodsBachelor students in closing term and registered nurses with at least one year job experience underwent a multiple choice test in pharmacology, drug management and drug dose calculations: 3x14 questions with 3¿4 alternative answers (score 0¿42). Certainty of each answer was recorded with score 0¿3, 0¿1 indicating need for assistance. Risk of error was scored 1¿3, where 3 expressed high risk: being certain that a wrong answer was correct. The results are presented as mean and (SD).ResultsParticipants were 243 graduating students (including 29 men), aged 28.2 (7.6) years, and 203 registered nurses (including 16 men), aged 42.0 (9.3) years and with a working experience of 12.4 years (9.2). The knowledge among the nurses was found to be superior to that of the students: 68.9%(8.0) and 61.5%(7.8) correct answers, respectively, (p¿<¿0.001). The difference was largest in drug management and dose calculations. The improvement occurred during the first working year. The nurses expressed higher degree of certainty and the risk of error was lower, both overall and for each topic (p¿<¿0.01). Low risk of error was associated with high knowledge and high sense of coping (p¿<¿0.001).ConclusionsThe medication knowledge among experienced nurses was superior to bachelor students in nursing, but nevertheless insufficient. As much as 25% of the answers to the drug management questions would lead to high risk of error. More emphasis should be put into the basic nursing education and in the introduction to medication procedures in clinical practice to improve the nurses¿ medication knowledge and reduce the risk of error.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 82 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 82 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 24%
Student > Master 19 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 9%
Student > Postgraduate 7 9%
Unspecified 6 7%
Other 23 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 38 46%
Unspecified 15 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 17%
Business, Management and Accounting 5 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 4%
Other 7 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 November 2014.
All research outputs
#1,036,531
of 4,549,714 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#679
of 2,090 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,604
of 141,837 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#47
of 119 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,549,714 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,090 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 141,837 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 119 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.