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Trends in cardiovascular risk factors among U.S. men and women with and without diabetes, 1988–2014

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, November 2017
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Title
Trends in cardiovascular risk factors among U.S. men and women with and without diabetes, 1988–2014
Published in
BMC Public Health, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4921-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xingxing Sun, Tingting Du

Abstract

Studies evidenced that reduction in cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in diabetic patients can be attributed to improvements in major CVD risk factors and evidence-based treatments. Furthermore, studies showed that the relative risk of CVD mortality associated with diabetes compared with non-diabetes is stronger in women than in men. Hence, we aimed to examine trends in CVD risk factors and intervention measures by sex and diabetic status. Analysis of 5 distinct cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 1988-1994, 1999-2002, 2003-2006, 2007-2010, and 2010-2014. Since detailed information on nontraditional risk factors such as sleep apnea was not available in each NHANES survey, traditional CVD risk factors including obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia were assessed in the study. To assess whether changes throughout the 27-year period differed by diabetes status, a logistic regression analysis was utilized to examine potential interaction effects between survey and diabetes. The similar process was repeated for sex. Means of all risk factors except body mass index and waist circumference decreased and the prevalence of antihypertensive and lipid-lowering medication use increased over time among diabetic and non-diabetic men and women. For both men and women, survey × diabetes status interaction terms for changes in HDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels were not statistically significant, while the prevalence of antihypertensive and lipid-lowering medication use increased more in diabetic than in non-diabetic persons (all P < 0.001). For women, survey × diabetes status interaction terms indicated that compared with the first survey, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and non-HDL-cholesterol fallen more in diabetic than in non-diabetic persons (all P < 0.001). In the diabetic state, men experienced similar changes in means of all CVD risk factors and the prevalence of antihypertensive and lipid-lowering medication use as women (all P for interactions between survey and sex were >0.01). The major traditional CVD risk factors in diabetic men decreased to the same extent that they did for non-diabetic men. The magnitude of changes in the favorable trends in diabetic women was of similar or greater compared with those among non-diabetic women. Diabetic women had as good an improvement in CVD risk factors as diabetic men.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 4 21%
Student > Master 3 16%
Unspecified 3 16%
Researcher 3 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Other 4 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 7 37%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 5%
Other 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 March 2018.
All research outputs
#10,146,932
of 12,695,728 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#7,461
of 8,661 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#278,421
of 387,370 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#588
of 678 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,695,728 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 678 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.