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An evaluation of primary care led dementia diagnostic services in Bristol

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
46 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
An evaluation of primary care led dementia diagnostic services in Bristol
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12913-014-0592-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emily Dodd, Richard Cheston, Tina Fear, Ellie Brown, Chris Fox, Clare Morley, Rosalyn Jefferies, Richard Gray

Abstract

BackgroundTypically people who go to see their GP with a memory problem will be initially assessed and those patients who seem to be at risk will be referred onto a memory clinic. The demographic forces mean that memory services will need to expand to meet demand. An alternative may be to expand the role of primary care in dementia diagnosis and care. The aim of this study was to contrast patient, family member and professional experience of primary and secondary (usual) care led memory services.MethodsA qualitative, participatory study. A topic guide was developed by the peer and professional panels. Data were collected through peer led interviews of people with dementia, their family members and health professionals.ResultsEleven (21%) of the 53 GP practices in Bristol offered primary care led dementia services. Three professional panels were held and were attended by 9 professionals; nine carers but no patients were involved in the three peer panels. These panels identified four main themes: GPs rarely make independent dementia diagnosis; GPs and memory nurses work together; patients and carers generally experience a high quality diagnostic service; an absence of post diagnostic support. Evidence relating to these themes was collected through a total of 46 participants took part; 23 (50%) in primary care and 23 (50%) in the memory service.ConclusionsPatients and carers were generally satisfied with either primary or secondary care led approaches to dementia diagnosis. Their major concern, shared with many health care professionals, was a lack of post diagnostic support.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 45 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 22%
Unspecified 7 15%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Other 12 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 26%
Unspecified 9 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 20%
Psychology 9 20%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 4%
Other 5 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 February 2015.
All research outputs
#1,624,252
of 13,384,723 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#734
of 4,477 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,239
of 298,028 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#79
of 495 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,384,723 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,477 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,028 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 495 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.