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A quantitative exploration of the sociocultural context of teenage pregnancy in Sri Lanka

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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89 Mendeley
Title
A quantitative exploration of the sociocultural context of teenage pregnancy in Sri Lanka
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12884-014-0394-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Neelamani Rajapaksa-Hewageegana, Sarah Maria Salway, Hilary Piercy, Sarath Samarage

Abstract

BackgroundIn common with other countries, teenage pregnancy is attracting policy attention in Sri Lanka because of the risks it poses to maternal and infant health and social and economic well-being. This study aimed to increase understanding of the context of teenage pregnancy, by (1) describing the socio-economic and demographic characteristics of pregnant teenagers and their partners; (2) exploring whether teenage pregnancies are planned and how they are received; and (3) exploring factors associated with unplanned teenage pregnancy.MethodsA population health-register based sample survey was conducted in Badulla District, Sri Lanka. Interviewer-administered questionnaires were administered to two samples: 450 pregnant women aged less than 20 years; and 150 male partners of pregnant women aged less than 20 years. Bivariate statistics described the characteristics and context of teenage pregnancy. Multivariate logistic regression explored correlates of unplanned pregnancy.ResultsOver 60% of pregnant teenagers and male partners indicated that the current pregnancy was planned; while 79% of pregnant teenagers and 85% of male partners welcomed the pregnancy. Most pregnant teenagers were living within stable and supportive family environments, with 94% reporting that they felt `very well supported¿. Nevertheless, a sub-group of pregnant teenagers appeared to be vulnerable, reporting unplanned and unhappy pregnancy; factors that were also associated with first intercourse being reported as not wanted. Levels of reproductive and contraceptive knowledge were poor among both pregnant teenagers and male partners. Just 46% of teenagers and 64% of male partners knew that pregnancy was possible at first intercourse. Mothers appear to be an important source of information and support for young women, with peers being reported far less often.ConclusionsIntervention to reduce teenage pregnancy must recognise the normative nature of early childbearing for the majority of girls who currently conceive and their families. Avoiding such pregnancies will require a fundamental shift in life chances such that delaying pregnancy offers significant socioeconomic advantages. Meanwhile, improved provision of contraceptive information and services is needed to support the delay of second pregnancies for young mothers. In addition, strategies to identify and protect those girls who are vulnerable to unwanted sexual activity are needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 1 1%
Unknown 88 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 19 21%
Unspecified 11 12%
Student > Postgraduate 11 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 11%
Student > Master 10 11%
Other 28 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 20%
Unspecified 14 16%
Social Sciences 10 11%
Psychology 9 10%
Other 12 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 January 2015.
All research outputs
#6,888,387
of 12,409,489 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,470
of 2,264 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,083
of 249,118 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#238
of 370 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,409,489 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,264 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,118 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 370 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.