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DNA methylation profiling reveals novel diagnostic biomarkers in renal cell carcinoma

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
DNA methylation profiling reveals novel diagnostic biomarkers in renal cell carcinoma
Published in
BMC Medicine, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12916-014-0235-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brittany N Lasseigne, Todd C Burwell, Mohini A Patil, Devin M Absher, James D Brooks, Richard M Myers

Abstract

BackgroundRenal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the tenth most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States. While it is usually lethal when metastatic, RCC is successfully treated with surgery when tumors are confined to the kidney and have low tumor volume. Because most early stage renal tumors do not result in symptoms, there is a strong need for biomarkers that can be used to detect the presence of the cancer as well as to monitor patients during and after therapy.MethodsWe examined genome-wide DNA methylation alterations in renal cell carcinomas of diverse histologies and benign adjacent kidney tissues from 96 patients.ResultsWe observed widespread methylation differences between tumors and benign adjacent tissues, particularly in immune-, G-protein coupled receptor-, and metabolism-related genes. Additionally, we identified a single panel of DNA methylation biomarkers that reliably distinguishes tumor from benign adjacent tissue in all of the most common kidney cancer histologic subtypes, and a second panel does the same specifically for clear cell renal cell carcinoma tumors. This set of biomarkers were validated independently with excellent performance characteristics in more than 1,000 tissues in The Cancer Genome Atlas clear cell, papillary, and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma datasets.ConclusionsThese DNA methylation profiles provide insights into the etiology of renal cell carcinoma and, most importantly, demonstrate clinically applicable biomarkers for use in early detection of kidney cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 5%
Ukraine 1 5%
Unknown 18 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 30%
Other 3 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 15%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 10%
Other 3 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 25%
Unknown 2 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 November 2017.
All research outputs
#6,819,992
of 12,134,677 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#1,648
of 1,938 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#113,347
of 275,639 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#54
of 65 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,134,677 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,938 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.2. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,639 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.