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Human T-lymphotropic virus 1aA circulation and risk factors for sexually transmitted infections in an Amazon geographic area with lowest human development index (Marajó Island, Northern Brazil)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2017
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14 Mendeley
Title
Human T-lymphotropic virus 1aA circulation and risk factors for sexually transmitted infections in an Amazon geographic area with lowest human development index (Marajó Island, Northern Brazil)
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2859-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Samantha Assis de Aguiar, Samires Avelino de Souza França, Barbara Brasil Santana, Mike Barbosa Santos, Felipe Bonfim Freitas, Glenda Ferreira, Izaura Cayres-Vallinoto, Marluísa O. G. Ishak, Ricardo Ishak, Antonio Carlos Rosário Vallinoto

Abstract

This cross-sectional study evaluated the prevalence of infection with human T-lymphotropic virus 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) in a population from the municipalities of Anajás, Chaves, São Sebastião da Boa Vista (SSBV) and Portel in the Marajó Archipelago and correlated these data with the epidemiological characteristics of the study population. A total of 1899 biological samples were evaluated. The samples were screened for the presence of anti-HTLV antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and infection was confirmed using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real-time PCR and nucleotide sequencing. Eleven samples (0.58%) were seropositive for HTLV, but molecular analysis confirmed positivity in only two samples (0.11%). Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis indicated that the two samples positive for HTLV-1 that were isolated in Chaves belonged to the Cosmopolitan subtype 1 (HTLV-1a) and Transcontinental subgroup (A). Our results confirmed the presence of Cosmopolitan Transcontinental HTLV-1 in the Marajó Archipelago, Amazon region, and the majority of the population revealed a lack of knowledge about sexually transmitted infections, which increases the risk of dissemination of HTLV and other agents.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 36%
Unspecified 3 21%
Student > Postgraduate 2 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 2 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 29%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 14%
Psychology 1 7%
Other 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 December 2017.
All research outputs
#10,884,777
of 12,281,604 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,939
of 4,525 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#285,787
of 344,785 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#262
of 334 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 334 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.