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The Clinical Education Partnership Initiative: an innovative approach to global health education

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, December 2014
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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53 Mendeley
Title
The Clinical Education Partnership Initiative: an innovative approach to global health education
Published in
BMC Medical Education, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12909-014-0246-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aliza Monroe-Wise, Minnie Kibore, James Kiarie, Ruth Nduati, Joseph Mburu, Frederick Thurston Drake, William Bremner, King Holmes, Carey Farquhar

Abstract

BackgroundDespite evidence that international clinical electives can be educationally and professionally beneficial to both visiting and in-country trainees, these opportunities remain challenging for American residents to participate in abroad. Additionally, even when logistically possible, they are often poorly structured. The Universities of Washington (UW) and Nairobi (UoN) have enjoyed a long-standing research collaboration, which recently expanded into the UoN Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI). Based on MEPI in Kenya, the Clinical Education Partnership Initiative (CEPI) is a new educational exchange program between UoN and UW. CEPI allows UW residents to partner with Kenyan trainees in clinical care and teaching activities at Naivasha District Hospital (NDH), one of UoN¿s MEPI training sites in Kenya.MethodsUW and UoN faculty collaborated to create a curriculum and structure for the program. A Chief Resident from the UW Department of Medicine coordinated the program at NDH. From August 2012 through April 2014, 32 UW participants from 5 medical specialties spent between 4 and 12 weeks working in NDH. In addition to clinical duties, all took part in formal and informal educational activities. Before and after their rotations, UW residents completed surveys evaluating clinical competencies and cross-cultural educational and research skills. Kenyan trainees also completed surveys after working with UW residents for three months.ResultsUW trainees reported a significant increase in exposure to various tropical and other diseases, an increased sense of self-reliance, particularly in a resource-limited setting, and an improved understanding of how social and cultural factors can affect health. Kenyan trainees reported both an increase in clinical skills and confidence, and an appreciation for learning a different approach to patient care and professionalism.ConclusionsAfter participating in CEPI, both Kenyan and US trainees noted improvement in their clinical knowledge and skills and a broader understanding of what it means to be clinicians. Through structured partnerships between institutions, educational exchange that benefits both parties is possible.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 4%
Unknown 51 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 23%
Student > Master 8 15%
Unspecified 6 11%
Student > Postgraduate 6 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 9%
Other 16 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 33 62%
Unspecified 10 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Arts and Humanities 2 4%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 3 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 January 2015.
All research outputs
#2,264,862
of 4,714,471 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#533
of 824 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,153
of 157,019 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#32
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,714,471 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 824 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 157,019 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.