↓ Skip to main content

Successful treatment of cerebral aspergillosis: case report of a patient with T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia (T-LGL)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Readers on

mendeley
7 Mendeley
Title
Successful treatment of cerebral aspergillosis: case report of a patient with T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia (T-LGL)
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2877-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amin T. Turki, Jassin Rashidi-Alavijeh, Jan Dürig, Guido Gerken, Peter-Michael Rath, Oliver Witzke

Abstract

Invasive aspergillosis involving patients with neutropenia or severe immunosuppression, such as patients with hematologic malignancies is associated with high mortality. Patients with T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia (T-LGL) on the other hand are considered to be less vulnerable for severe opportunistic fungal infection as their course of disease is chronic and marked by less violent cytopenia then in e.g. Aplastic Anemia. Only neutropenia is regarded as independent risk factor for severe opportunistic infection in T-LGL patients. We report a case of a 53 year old patient with T-LGL, Immune-Thrombocytopenia (ITP) and combined antibody deficiency, who presented with fever and reduced general condition. The patient revealed a complicated infection involving the lungs and later the brain, with the presentation of vomiting and seizures. Broad microbiological testing of blood-, lung- and cerebrospinal fluid samples was inconclusive. In the absence of mycological proof, Aspergillus infection was confirmed by pathological examination of a brain specimen and finally successfully treated with liposomal amphotericin B and voriconazole, adopting a long-term treatment scheme. Beyond typical problems in the clinical practice involving fungal infections and hematologic malignancies, this case of invasive aspergillosis in a patient with T-LGL illustrates caveats in diagnosis, therapy and follow-up. Our data support careful ambulatory monitoring for patients with T-LGL, even in the absence of neutropenia. Especially those patients with combined hematologic malignancies and immune defects are at risk. Long-term treatment adhesion for 12 months with sufficient drug levels was necessary for sustained clearance from infection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 29%
Student > Bachelor 2 29%
Other 1 14%
Student > Postgraduate 1 14%
Unspecified 1 14%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 57%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 14%
Neuroscience 1 14%
Unspecified 1 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 January 2018.
All research outputs
#10,963,057
of 12,371,405 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,970
of 4,561 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#291,347
of 350,341 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#266
of 337 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,371,405 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,561 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 350,341 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 337 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.