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The role of general practice in routes to diagnosis of lung cancer in Denmark: a population-based study of general practice involvement, diagnostic activity and diagnostic intervals

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, January 2015
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Title
The role of general practice in routes to diagnosis of lung cancer in Denmark: a population-based study of general practice involvement, diagnostic activity and diagnostic intervals
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12913-014-0656-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Louise Mahncke Guldbrandt, Morten Fenger-Grøn, Torben Riis Rasmussen, Henry Jensen, Peter Vedsted

Abstract

BackgroundLung cancer stage at diagnosis predicts possible curative treatment. In Denmark and the UK, lung cancer patients have lower survival rates than citizens in most other European countries, which may partly be explained by a comparatively longer diagnostic interval in these two countries. In Denmark, a pathway was introduced in 2008 allowing general practitioners (GPs) to refer patients suspected of having lung cancer directly to fast-track diagnostics. However, symptom presentation of lung cancer in general practice is known to be diverse and complex, and systematic knowledge of the routes to diagnosis is needed to enable earlier lung cancer diagnosis in Denmark. This study aims to describe the routes to diagnosis, the diagnostic activity preceding diagnosis and the diagnostic intervals for lung cancer in the Danish setting.MethodsWe conducted a national registry-based cohort study on 971 consecutive incident lung cancer patients in 2010 using data from national registries and GP questionnaires.ResultsGPs were involved in 68.3% of cancer patients¿ diagnostic pathways, and 27.4% of lung cancer patients were referred from the GP to fast-track diagnostic work-up. A minimum of one X-ray was performed in 85.6% of all cases before diagnosis. Patients referred through a fast-track route more often had diagnostic X-rays (66.0%) than patients who did not go through fast-track (49.4%). Overall, 33.6% of all patients had two or more X-rays performed during the 90 days before diagnosis. Patients whose symptoms were interpreted as non-alarm symptoms or who were not referred to fast-track were more likely to experience a long diagnostic interval than patients whose symptoms were interpreted as alarm symptoms or who were referred to fast-track.ConclusionsLung cancer patients followed several diagnostic pathways. The existing fast-track pathway must be supplemented to ensure earlier detection of lung cancer. The high incidence of multiple X-rays warrants a continued effort to develop more accurate lung cancer tests for use in primary care.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 37 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 24%
Other 5 13%
Student > Master 3 8%
Librarian 2 5%
Other 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 58%
Unspecified 6 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 January 2015.
All research outputs
#3,923,815
of 4,683,775 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#1,973
of 2,154 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,729
of 161,599 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#57
of 66 outputs
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