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The effect of ankle tape on joint position sense after local muscle fatigue: a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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53 Mendeley
Title
The effect of ankle tape on joint position sense after local muscle fatigue: a randomized controlled trial
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1909-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Akram Jahjah, Dietmar Seidenspinner, Karl Schüttler, Antonio Klasan, Thomas J. Heyse, Dominik Malcherczyk, Bilal Farouk El-Zayat

Abstract

Ankle tape is widely used by athletes to prevent ankle sprain. Although there is growing evidence that ankle tape improve joint position sense, but yet it is not clear even if tape improve joint position sense after muscle fatigue, because fatigue impair joint position sense and raise the risk of ankle sprain. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of ankle tape on joint position sense after local muscle fatigue. This trial is a randomized controlled trial. 34 healthy subjects participated in this trial. Subjects were randomized distributed into two groups: with tape and without tape. Active and passive absolute error and variable error mean values for two target positions of the ankle joint (15° inversions and inversion minus 5°) before and after fatigue protocol consisted of 30 consecutive maximal concentric/concentric contractions of the ankle evertors and invertors. In this trail joint position sense for all subjects was assessed using The Biodex System isokinetic dynamometer 3, this system is used also for fatigue protocol. For the variable error (VE), significant mean effect was found for active joint position sense in 15° of inversion after muscle fatigue (P < 0, 05). It was a significant decrease in the work in the last third of inversion detected (P < 0, 05). There was no significant main effect found for fatigue index of eversion. Ankle tape can improve joint position sense at the fatigue session when joint position sense becomes worse. As a result, ankle tape may be useful to prevent ankle sprain during playing sports. We suggest athletes and individuals at risk of ankle sprain to apply taping before high-load activity. The study was retrospectively registered on the ISRCTN registry with study ID ISRCTN30042335 on 12th December 2017.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 53 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 21%
Student > Bachelor 9 17%
Unspecified 6 11%
Lecturer 5 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 9%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 9 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 17 32%
Sports and Recreations 9 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 15%
Unspecified 6 11%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 9 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 November 2018.
All research outputs
#7,279,407
of 13,770,158 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,208
of 2,725 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,430
of 352,828 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,770,158 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,725 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 352,828 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them