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Assessing the seasonal prevalence and risk factors for nuchal crest adiposity in domestic horses and ponies using the Cresty Neck Score

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
Title
Assessing the seasonal prevalence and risk factors for nuchal crest adiposity in domestic horses and ponies using the Cresty Neck Score
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12917-015-0327-7
Pubmed ID
Abstract

BackgroundNuchal crest adiposity in horses and ponies has been associated with an enhanced risk of metabolic health problems. However, there is no current information on the prevalence of, and risk factors specific to, nuchal crest adiposity in horses and ponies. In addition, the cresty neck score has not previously been utilised across different seasons within a UK leisure population, it is not know whether nuchal crest adiposity shows the same seasonal trends as general obesity.ResultsA Cresty Neck Score (CNS, 0¿5) was given to 96 horses with access to pasture (>6 h per day) at the end of winter and at the end of summer in order to obtain two prevalence estimates. Risk factors were assessed using the single outcome cresty neck/no cresty neck in either season (binary), from owner questionnaires and analysed using a mixed effects logistic regression model (outcome variable CNS <3 or CNS¿¿¿3/5). Agreement between winter and summer scores was assessed using weighted Kappa methods.Winter CNS values were significantly higher than summer CNS values (p¿=¿0.002) indicating a systematic bias. The prevalence of a CNS¿¿¿3/5 was 45.83% at the end of winter, falling to 33.33% at the end of summer and was higher in ponies (<14.2hh) than horses (¿14.2hh) in both seasons. This may reflect a real winter increase in regional fat deposition, or an increased difficulty in obtaining an accurate estimate of regional adiposity in winter months. Breed was the strongest risk factor for CNS¿¿¿3/5 in both seasons, with native UK breeds appearing to be most at risk (p¿<¿0.001). In a separate, small validation study, the CNS showed good inter-observer reliability.ConclusionsThe prevalence of a CNS¿¿¿3/5 was higher at the end of winter than at the end of summer, which was the opposite pattern seasonal variation to that observed for general obesity. Further studies are required to investigate the potential influence of time of year upon CNS interpretation and studies utilising the CNS should consider potential seasonal variability in nuchal crest adiposity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 6%
United States 1 3%
Unknown 31 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 18%
Other 4 12%
Student > Postgraduate 4 12%
Researcher 4 12%
Other 9 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 53%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 9 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 9%
Unspecified 2 6%
Chemistry 1 3%
Other 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2015.
All research outputs
#1,167,886
of 5,227,587 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#110
of 899 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,202
of 184,622 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#11
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,227,587 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 899 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 184,622 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.