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Vaginal dysbiosis increases risk of preterm fetal membrane rupture, neonatal sepsis and is exacerbated by erythromycin

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 2,095)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
91 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
48 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
105 Mendeley
Title
Vaginal dysbiosis increases risk of preterm fetal membrane rupture, neonatal sepsis and is exacerbated by erythromycin
Published in
BMC Medicine, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12916-017-0999-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Richard G. Brown, Julian R. Marchesi, Yun S. Lee, Ann Smith, Benjamin Lehne, Lindsay M. Kindinger, Vasso Terzidou, Elaine Holmes, Jeremy K. Nicholson, Phillip R. Bennett, David A. MacIntyre

Abstract

Preterm prelabour rupture of the fetal membranes (PPROM) precedes 30% of preterm births and is a risk factor for early onset neonatal sepsis. As PPROM is strongly associated with ascending vaginal infection, prophylactic antibiotics are widely used. The evolution of vaginal microbiota compositions associated with PPROM and the impact of antibiotics on bacterial compositions are unknown. We prospectively assessed vaginal microbiota prior to and following PPROM using MiSeq-based sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and examined the impact of erythromycin prophylaxis on bacterial load and community structures. In contrast to pregnancies delivering at term, vaginal dysbiosis characterised by Lactobacillus spp. depletion was present prior to the rupture of fetal membranes in approximately a third of cases (0% vs. 27%, P = 0.026) and persisted following membrane rupture (31%, P = 0.005). Vaginal dysbiosis was exacerbated by erythromycin treatment (47%, P = 0.00009) particularly in women initially colonised by Lactobacillus spp. Lactobacillus depletion and increased relative abundance of Sneathia spp. were associated with subsequent funisitis and early onset neonatal sepsis. Our data show that vaginal microbiota composition is a risk factor for subsequent PPROM and is associated with adverse short-term maternal and neonatal outcomes. This highlights vaginal microbiota as a potentially modifiable antenatal risk factor for PPROM and suggests that routine use of erythromycin for PPROM be re-examined.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 48 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 105 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 21 20%
Student > Master 15 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 11%
Student > Bachelor 11 10%
Other 33 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 40 38%
Unspecified 25 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 7%
Other 8 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 772. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 June 2018.
All research outputs
#6,434
of 13,153,703 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#8
of 2,095 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#387
of 347,215 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,153,703 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,095 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 34.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 347,215 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them